US Catholic Faith in Real Life

What happens after we die?

“We will all be changed,” according to Paul.

By Alice Camille |
Article Your Faith

If you’re hankering for the storybook heaven in which you get your heart’s desire and live happily ever after, the writer of the letter to the Hebrews just may support it. “Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for” (Heb. 11:1).

Take note: Trust in God is the nonnegotiable price of admission. Eternity as the land of hopes is not a bad way to envision the hereafter. This may or may not include an endless supply of blue corn chips—but for me, heaven would be a nonstarter without them.


Have a grand plan? Don’t neglect the present for the future

For the most part, biblical tomorrow is a bleak prospect.

By Alice Camille |
Article Your Faith

Maybe you’re not big into the vision thing. You may not have a comprehensive game plan for living, no crystalline goal that will let you know you’ve arrived when you get there. Not many of us apprehend in kindergarten the purpose for which we were born. 


Make America meek again

Meekness may be a more laudable quality than ‘greatness.’

By Alice Camille |
Article Your Faith

The great fun of being a Catholic catechist is that people treat you like the Answer Lady. They turn to you in all sincerity and ask: “What does the Bible have to say about dinosaurs? What was Jesus like as a kid? When Mary says the rosary, does she say, ‘Blessed are thou among women’ or ‘blessed am I’? What’s heaven really like?”

A newbie religious educator will try to address every question with as much depth, breadth, and dignity as can be mustered. These days I’ve grown quite comfortable with two previously avoided responses: “The Bible doesn’t say much” and “I don’t know.”


What did Jesus think of immigration?

Those who welcome the stranger step into eternal life.

By Alice Camille |
Article Your Faith

Anyone who imagines Jesus has no stake in the debate about our treatment of the stranger at our borders needs to attend more Bible study. One of his most beloved parables concerns a good Samaritan: unwelcome in Israelite territory because he wasn’t “one of them,” a descendent of despised transplants who didn’t belong. The Samaritan alone shows compassion for an injured Israelite who, if he’d been in full vigor, might well have cursed him. Jesus pronounces the Samaritan a true neighbor.


The unofficial apostle of Christ

Discipleship comes in many forms.

By Kevin P. Considine |
Article Your Faith

Mark’s Gospel tells a particularly striking healing story, that of a man suffering a fate worse than death. This man is “possessed with an impure spirit,” and he has no name and no identity.


Here’s what keeping God at the center of our lives really means

To deny God’s centrality in our lives is to deny the definition of divinity.

By Alice Camille |
Article Your Faith

People become writers for all sorts of reasons. A natural reticence in the presence of others, for example. Some of us may be halting of speech or think slowly and need more time to process an idea than the average conversation can support. A few may value precision in language so highly that to risk a clumsy word choice is intolerable. And of course some prefer the anonymity of the written word, because their ideas are too dangerous to personally own up to. 


Why yet another biblical commentary is worth celebrating

Good scripture commentary helps us go deeper into the sacred stories.

By Alice Camille |
Article Your Faith

Imagine someone like Yentl from the movie of the same name. She’s a Jewish teenager so enamored of the dream of studying the sacred texts of her people that she takes the dangerous step of posing as a male to enroll in a Torah school restricted to boys. Stakes are high and mayhem ensues.


How will the church respond to today’s apocalyptic times?

Scripture tells us all things pass away but faith, hope, and love, and through God all things will be made new over time.

By Alice Camille |
Article Your Faith

I’m bone tired of it, as you are. This persistent season of betrayal and reproach under which our church currently labors. Relentless revelations of clergy preying on children and bishops moving abusers around is a gnawing ache in the soul of every Catholic—as it should be.


What the agony in the garden says about human suffering

How scripture can help you talk to your kids about pain and suffering.

By Annemarie Scobey-Polacheck |
Article Your Faith

Jesus came with them to Gethsemane and said to his disciples, “Sit here while I go over there and pray.” He took along Peter and the two sons of Zebedee, and began to feel sorrow and distress. Then he said to them. “My soul is sorrowful even to death. Remain here and keep watch with me.” He advanced a little and feel prostrate in prayer, saying, “My Father, if it is possible, let this cup pass from me; yet, not as I will, but as you will.”


Matthew, Mark, Luke, and . . . Thomas

Scripture scholar Elaine Pagels on how the Gospel of Thomas and other noncanonical gospels renew her faith.

By A U.S. Catholic interview |
Article Your Faith

After Elaine Pagels’ young son died of a rare lung disease, and later when her husband was killed in a climbing accident in the Rockies, friends would often comment that her faith must be a real help in her grief. It was. Pagels was able to find hope in the midst of Christian community, ritual, and liturgy that she didn’t experience anywhere else. But when she realized that comfort had little to do with confessing belief in any creed, she began to question how Christianity came to be associated with intellectual assent to a set of beliefs.


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