US Catholic Faith in Real Life

What does Amazon’s Mrs. Maisel really say about women and careers?

Can women really have it all?

By Pamela Hill Nettleton |
Article Culture

It’s just so pretty.

Amazon’s knockout series The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel swept the Emmys, pocketed two Golden Globe awards, and was just renewed for its third season even before its second debuted in December. Created by Amy Sherman-Palladino, who is executive producer along with her husband, Daniel Palladino, the show features their signature rocket-speed dialogue, snappy repartee, and sassy pop culture references, set against technicolor-hued sets and Edith Head-worthy wardrobes. 

Advertisement


Conversion therapy is isn’t helping anyone, two films show

Corners of America still need a reminder that attempting to change same-sex attraction is a harmful endeavor.

By Danny Duncan Collum |
Article Culture

You know there’s something in the air when two movies on the same topic hit the theaters within a few months of each other. That’s what happened last year with two films about gay teenagers whose evangelical Christian parents send them to “conversion therapy” programs to become heterosexual. 

Advertisement


Are women turning to witchcraft in the era of #MeToo?

Women are seeking spiritual practices that respect their wisdom, creativity, and leadership.

By Jessica Mesman |
Article Culture

Christian witches? What’s next? Married bachelors? Square circles?

A combination of disbelief, mockery, and genuine concern for the souls of those who might claim such a label populated a friend’s Facebook thread when he referenced a rise in Christians who also identify as witches.

Advertisement


Is the church’s teaching on labor gaining more ground?

The new film ‘Sorry to Bother You’ is a sign that change may be coming.

By Danny Duncan Collum |
Article Culture

My nomination for the most important movie of 2018 has a plot that doesn’t involve superheroes or space travel, and its production didn’t involve any of the usual Hollywood oligarchs. It’s Sorry to Bother You, an independent feature written and directed by hip-hop artist, activist, and self-identified “communist” Boots Riley. The movie is a sort of magical realist satire built around a union organizing drive at a shady telemarketing company.

Advertisement


Can misfortune run in the family?

In the new film ‘Hereditary,’ characters are doomed to live out drama set in motion by an earlier generation.

By Jessica Mesman |
Article Culture

I the Lord your God am a jealous God, punishing children for the iniquity of parents, to the third and the fourth generation of those who reject me (Exod. 20:5).

Advertisement


Netflix’s ‘Lost in Space’ is a modern take on a classic family story

In this new version of the classic show, children and parents must work to overcome their estrangement, a situation all too familiar to modern parents.

By Pamela Hill Nettleton |
Article Culture

Toss a family onto a deserted tropical island—or, say, an uncharted planet in outer space—and see what happens when all social and cultural conventions and pressures are swept away and parents and children are forced to work together to survive. 

That was the story arc of Johann David Wyss’ Swiss Family Robinson novel in 1812, which was made into a film twice—in 1960 and in 1998. Then the Robinsons were reimagined as being shipwrecked not in the East Indies but in outer space on an uncharted planet in the Lost in Space CBS television series in the 1960s. 

Advertisement


Making sense of Sunday

Is ‘Come Sunday’ the tale of a brave spirit or a tragedy about a religious tradition that gives its followers few tools for making sense of their faith?

By Danny Duncan Collum |
Article Culture

In the past 25 years or so, nondenominational evangelical Protestantism seems to have become the state religion of the American suburbs, and in many of those churches every pastor is a pope. They face no educational requirement, and their only accountability comes when the offering basket is passed. If it is full enough then grace abounds. If a preacher rubs congregants the wrong way, abuses their trust, or just tells them things they don’t want to hear, they leave. 

Advertisement


In new pope biopic, Pope Francis finds space to speak

‘Pope Francis: A Man of His Word’ is more than just the top hits of Francis’ papacy.

By Kathleen Manning |
Article Culture

Midway through the documentary Pope Francis: A Man of His Word, there is an image that brings to mind scenes from May’s Met Gala celebrating Catholic imagination in fashion. Notably, there was no outfit at the ball resembling the cheap yellow rain poncho Pope Francis wore to celebrate Mass in the Philippines during a tropical storm. Nor was there anything resembling the simple habit papal namesake and ex-fashionista Francis of Assisi donned after renouncing his wealth to take up preaching the gospel.

Advertisement


5 questions with Randall Wright on ‘Summer in the Forest’

A new documentary traces Jean Vanier’s founding of L’Arche, providing a window into the existence of people with disabilities.

By Elizabeth Lefebvre |
Article Culture

Getting dressed. Going to work. Enjoying dinner with friends or family. Celebrating an engagement. These are just a few of the moments a new documentary, Summer in the Forest, captures that provide a glimpse into the lives of people with disabilities living in L’Arche communities.

Advertisement


Pages