US Catholic Faith in Real Life

Let Catherine of Siena find her way into your Toyota Sienna

‘Be who God meant you to be and you will set the world on fire.’

By Annemarie Scobey |
Article Your Faith

St. Catherine of Siena. Our Toyota Sienna minivan has an extra “n,” and on our busiest days I could be known as Annemarie of Sienna. (I did not include “Saint” before my name.) But I admired St. Catherine of Siena long before I needed three rows of seats to transport our family. 

St. Catherine of Siena said, “Be who God meant you to be and you will set the world on fire.” 

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Don’t shy away from tears, they are a sign of grace

In the face of God, sometimes we can’t help but cry.

By Annemarie Scobey |
Article Lifestyle Your Faith

I cried at my wedding. After we exchanged the vows I sat down next to Bill on the altar and the tears started.

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The good enough family

The family photos we show to the world on social media or Christmas cards don’t show the true state of family life.

By Catherine O'Connell-Cahill |
Article Lifestyle

No one wants to admit to having mice, because they think it reflects badly on their housekeeping skills. As if the mice are outside saying, “Hey, did you see that? They dropped a crumb on their kitchen floor. Let’s get in there!”

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Catholics have not cornered the market on truth

There’s a piece of truth in Catholicism, but that doesn’t diminish the truth found in other religions.

By Annemarie Scobey |
Article Your Faith

When our son Liam, now 20, was in second grade, I have a clear memory of his focus on Catholicism. It was the year of his first communion, and in his Catholic school discussions of the faith, sacraments, and the connection to his life permeated every activity. 

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Faithful parenting means getting creative now and then

Steering children in a positive direction often requires thinking outside the box.

By Annemarie Scobey |
Article Your Faith

When Katie and Kevin’s son Matthew was 2, Katie was concerned that he was getting lost in between his older brother Bennett and his baby sister Annabelle. “He was a huge challenge. I couldn’t seem to connect with him the way I did with Bennett. He was so impulsive and emotional,” Katie says. She feared that Matthew’s difficulty could lead to a relationship fraught with issues. She decided that the way to steer him to a more attached and positive relationship was through time set aside just for him.

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Everyone deserves a Catholic education, regardless of means

Helping young people become followers of Christ means making Catholic education accessible to all.

By Annemarie Scobey |
Article Lifestyle

“Why do you send your boys to a Catholic school?” my sons’ pediatrician asked, looking at the St. Monica school sweatshirts and uniform pants my two boys had strewn over the floor of the examining room. It was the boys’ yearly checkup, in 2002, and they sat expectantly in their Hot Wheels underwear as their doctor walked in. 

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Forget apologies, give the sign of peace instead

A sign of peace, genuinely given, brings Christ into a situation.

By Annemarie Scobey |
Article Lifestyle Your Faith

I’ve always liked the sign of peace. As a child, it was my favorite part of our all-school liturgies. The sign of peace provided an excuse to move around a little—to stretch across pews and vigorously shake hands with as many classmates as I could before the teacher reined us in for the Lamb of God. In college, when I attended daily Mass at Marquette University’s tiny Joan of Arc Chapel, the sign of peace was a chance to hug a friend who had an exam the next day or a roommate whose mom was ill. 

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How to keep your family’s Sabbath holy

Sabbath should last more than just the hour of Mass.

By Annemarie Scobey |
Article Your Faith

Our family has had trouble with the fourth commandment, keep holy the Sabbath day. It’s not that we skip Mass on Sunday, but rather that too often we only keep holy the Sabbath hour and a half (our time at Mass), rather than the Sabbath day itself. 

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Like Lent, being a parent is all about the wait

Sometimes the most important job of a parent is to watch and wait.

By Annemarie Scobey |
Article Your Faith

I was standing in the middle of a small frozen lake near our house, chatting with my husband and Nate, another father in our neighborhood. I was in ice skates and a down coat; Bill and Nate had on heavy boots and warm gear. The ice was about eight inches thick from a recent cold snap, and the wind was brisk from the north. As we talked, I noticed our teenage daughter walking out onto the ice in socks and sandals. From the other shore, Nate’s teenage son approached in basketball shorts and bare legs. 

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Lent a desert? Not with this snow.

For me, Lent is blackened snow in the streets and muddy boots in the hallway—about as far as you can get from hot and dry.

By Annemarie Scobey |
Article Your Faith

The analogy of Lent as a desert has never worked for me. I was born and raised in Wisconsin, and except for a year spent in Chicago, I’ve lived here my whole life. The closest I’ve come to a desert is the Desert Dome at Milwaukee’s Mitchell Park Conservatory. February and March in Wisconsin—the Lenten months—are about as far as you can get from hot and dry. Lent to me has always been cold and soggy. When Lent arrives in Wisconsin, winter is only half over.

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