US Catholic Faith in Real Life

How to love your kid, even when you don’t like them

It’s easy to love our children when they are being sweet. But what about when they act particularly rotten?

By Annemarie Scobey |
Article Lifestyle

This morning Liam, our 10-year-old, was upset because I wouldn’t let him eat Cocoa Krispies for breakfast. Despite a long-standing rule that sugared cereal is for weekends only, Liam thought this should be the morning that I made an exception. I said no.

Liam, overtired from staying up past his bedtime the night before, was soon a wailing mess on the couch. I held my ground and went about my morning routine matter-of-factly, deciding that ignoring Liam was the strategy that made the most sense.

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Advice to my son

A letter from writer Brian Doyle to his son.

By Brian Doyle |
Article Lifestyle

Don’t eat that! Do ask questions. Do not use that tone of voice with me, young man. Do pick up the wet towel from the floor and hang it either on the closet door or on the back of your bedroom door or in the bathroom as you have been asked to do since the beginning of recorded history.

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Looking for an active spiritual life? Try memorizing prayers.

To learn prayers by heart is to ensure they are there when you need God the most.

By Teresa Coda |
Article Lifestyle Your Faith

I could hardly believe it when I found myself reciting the Hail Mary as I was quickly wheeled into the operating room for an emergency C-section this past January. While the predominant emotions of the final moments leading up to my daughter’s birth were fear (“Will my baby be OK?”) and disappointment (“This isn’t going as I hoped it would.”), I also remember surprise that this particular prayer surfaced to my consciousness. Before the surgery, it had been years since I had prayed to Mary.

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Can social media connect us to God?

Despite having a bad rap, social media can create a rich faith community and deeper spiritual life, says this writer.

By Molly Jo Rose |
Article Culture

One bright morning in December, I broke my usual Sunday fast from technology to scroll through Instagram. My kids were dressed and the diaper bag was packed, so I had a few minutes before Mass to slump down on the couch overlooking our bay window and watch the snow on our lawn begin to melt due to the balmy 43-degree temperature in Fort Wayne.

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7 creative ways to encourage your kids to pray

Every day is different in homes with young children, and so can be the prayer.

By Susan Salaz |
Article Your Faith

When our oldest daughter started kindergarten, we replaced previously lazy mornings with a chaotic new routine of rigid uniforms, rushed breakfast, and wrestling kids into the car. Once we got the hang of it, I began to appreciate starting the day with a quiet drive—everyone together and safely contained in car seats. One day, halfway to school, I eagerly announced, “Let’s say a Hail Mary.”

My daughter met my eyes in the rearview mirror with a glare perfected at an early age—a learned behavior modeled by me, unfortunately. “We pray all day at school, Mommy,” she whined.

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How church teaching demands tidy—and unrealistic—gender roles

Church teachings give parents conflicting messages about the best balance between work and family.

By Jacob Kohlhaas |
Article Lifestyle

“Havoc” may best describe the lives of many Midwestern families this winter, as Mother Nature brought unrelenting wind, rain, snow, ice, and record-setting chills. For families like mine, balancing professional lives, parenting, and maintaining a household are demanding enough without becoming the object of nature’s merciless torments. Nonetheless, despite all the challenges that the conflicting demands of work and family introduce in our lives, this living on the edge of chaos is exactly what we chose. Most American parents want to work beyond the household, and most are doing so. 

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If the church wants to support family life, it should look to socioeconomics

Any Catholic teaching on family spirituality must consider the economic reality of American families.

By Meghan Murphy-Gill |
Article Lifestyle

I have one child, a son, born when I was two months from turning 35—the age when expectant mothers are termed geriatric. My one son seemingly presents a problem for a surprising number of strangers and people I know well: “Only one?” they ask suspiciously as they look at me with narrowed eyes. “But isn’t he going to be lonely?” (As the most off-the-charts extrovert in our family, he is not.) See also: “But big families are fun!” (For whom? I long to retort.) “I think you’ll regret it later if you don’t have more.” (The reverse could also be true.) “Children are a blessing!”

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Passing the faith is as easy as passing the potatoes

Catholicism is easier to pass along than you might think.

By Catherine O'Connell-Cahill |
Article Lifestyle

“Show, don’t tell” is one big commandment of writing. Telling is super boring: “The left fielder had a strong arm.” You want a writer to show you the scene: “As 31,942 fans watched in disbelief, Oakland A’s outfielder Yoenis Céspedes hurled the ball 300 feet from the left field corner of Angel Stadium and cut down the Angels’ Howie Kendrick as he streaked for home.”

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How to have better conversations with your kids

Four practices that can help parents and children move toward authentic conversation.

By Annemarie Scobey |
Article Lifestyle

Kevin and Amy have a rule at their dinner table for their three teenagers as well as themselves: What is said at the table stays at the table. “Our family committed to this when the children were young so they could express themselves without worry that their siblings or parents would talk to other people about what they shared,” Amy says. “They also don’t need to worry they are going to get in trouble for what they say. This has worked well for us, and some of our best conversations continue to happen at dinner.” 

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Visiting a child studying abroad? Few experiences are sweeter.

Traveling with adult children can be like parenthood turned upside down.

By Annemarie Scobey |
Article Lifestyle

I went to Spain so I wouldn’t need to make any decisions.

Liam, our 20-year-old, is spending this semester studying in Spain, and two of my friends offered to move into our home for a week and take on life with our two high-school daughters so Bill and I could visit him. The semester coincided with our 25th anniversary, and after asking each friend approximately 16 times if she was serious about the offer, Bill and I booked tickets and hotel rooms and didn’t plan anything else.

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