US Catholic Faith in Real Life

The Congo’s killing fields

By Kevin Clarke |
Article
Families separated. Millions left for dead. Do we share some of the blame?

Patrick Mwnyamahord knows where his father is buried because a neighbor showed him that small place. What he doesn't know is how his father got there, and there was no one he could safely ask, not then. Twelve years ago he and his family made one of a series of sudden escapes from the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) into nearby Burundi. On this particular exodus his father was too ill to travel and the family had to leave him.


A farewell to arms: Is it time to get rid of our guns?

By Kevin Clarke |
Article

Our best shot at protecting the common good isn’t to keep loading up on guns.

A few weeks before Adam Lanza began his shooting rampage among children in Newtown, Connecticut last December, Catholic priests in Chicago were leading weary processions against gun violence on the city’s gang-terrorized South Side. If the Newtown murders were a shock to the system, the regular gun violence that claims hundreds of lives each year in Chicago and other cities across the country has become so “normal” that the mayhem only occasionally warrants the raising of an editorial eyebrow.


Mom vs. bomb: A mother of 12 lives out her faith through peace activism

By Olga Bonfiglio |
Article
Jean Gump has been taking a stand against violence, even when it caused a blow-up at home.

Last fall, at age 85, Jean Gump was released from prison after being arrested and jailed with 12 other protesters. They were caught trespassing at an off-limits federal area at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, home of the atom bomb.


Examining terrorism and responses to it

By Kenneth R. Himes, O.F.M. |
Article
Fifty years after the game-changing Second Vatican Council a new generation helps the church respond to today’s signs of the times. Father Kenneth Himes, O.F.M. considers terrorism and responses to it.

Read more scholars on today's signs of the times.

Principle:


Sleeping through genocide?

By Kevin Clarke |
Article
The world needs a wake-up call to save a population at risk of meeting a violent end.

What is happening today in the Nuba mountains is exactly a carbon copy of what has been taking place in Darfur—only even worse,” said Bishop Macram Max Gassis, spiritual leader of Sudan’s Diocese of El Obeid. Gassis was speaking outside the United Nations in New York in July and worrying over what he describes as a deliberate campaign of ethnic cleansing against the Nuba people of Sudan’s South Kordofan state.


Guilt by disassociation: The moral toll of war on those who fight it

By Bryan Cones |
Article
The human cost of the war on terror burdens those who fight it.

Americans have grown accustomed to the long list of injuries suffered by the veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan: brain trauma, shrapnel wounds, lost limbs. Along with these has come a host of psychological and emotional damage: post-traumatic stress disorder, substance dependency and abuse, and depression, all leading to a ballooning rate of suicide among members of the armed forces.


Guilt by disassociation: The moral toll of war on those who fight it

By Bryan Cones |
Article
The human cost of the war on terror burdens those who fight it.

Americans have grown accustomed to the long list of injuries suffered by the veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan: brain trauma, shrapnel wounds, lost limbs. Along with these has come a host of psychological and emotional damage: post-traumatic stress disorder, substance dependency and abuse, and depression, all leading to a ballooning rate of suicide among members of the armed forces.


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