US Catholic Faith in Real Life

Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion

By Kristin Peterson |
Article

Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion
By Gregory Boyle, S.J. (Free Press, 2010)

While reading the stories of the “homies” that Father Gregory Boyle, S.J. has worked with for the past 20 years at his Homeboy Industries ministry among gang members in Los Angeles, it is easy to forget that these young people probably strike fear in most Americans. They are from the toughest neighborhoods, have shot and killed others, and have done time in prison.


God is Not One

By Megan Sweas |
Article

By Stephen Prothero (HarperOne, 2010)

In the comparative study of religion, there are two main lines of thought, both of which use the analogy of mountain climbing. One is that all religions take different routes up the same mountain and will meet at the peak, be it God or whatever you call it. The other is that adherents of each religion climb their own mountain. Not only are their paths unique, but the ultimate goal is as well.


The Jesuit Guide to Almost Everything: A Spirituality for Real Life

By Renée M. LaReau |
Article
The Jesuit Guide to Almost Everything: A Spirituality for Real Life By James Martin, S.J. (HarperOne, 2010)

“Who is St. Ignatius Loyola, what is a Jesuit, and why should you care?” Concise, factual answers to the first two questions can be readily found in James Martin’s book, but it’s his consideration of the third that provides the heft for this guide to all things Jesuit.


Field of Compassion

By Heidi Schlumpf |
Article

Field of Compassion By Judy Cannato (Sorin Books, 2010)

I'm no Albert Einstein. Science is just not my thing. Even Ira Flatow (of NPR's "Science Friday" fame) can't get me excited about sub-atomic particles, black holes, and astrophysics. But Judy Cannato can.


Dorothea Lange: A Life Beyond Limits

By Patrick McCormick |
Article
Dorothea Lange: A Life Beyond Limits By Linda Gordon (W. W. Norton & Company, 2009)

In the 1930s President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Farm Security Administration wanted to show America the faces of millions of farmworkers devastated by the Great Depression. This New Deal agency hired a small band of photographers to take pictures of Mexican migrant workers, African American sharecroppers, and Dust Bowl refugees.


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