US Catholic Faith in Real Life

A call of their own: The role of deacons in the church

By A U.S. Catholic interview |
Article Your Faith
Deacons are not meant to be mini-priests, or super-laypeople. But the church as we know it wouldn’t be the same without them.

Even after nearly 50 years, the permanent diaconate still confuses some people. If deacons aren’t priests, are they laypeople? No—they are ordained. Some deacons say that priests have told them that theirs is not a “real” vocation. Wrong again. Deacons are called to embody the image of Christ the servant; they represent the church in the community, and at Sunday Mass they bring the needs of the community to the attention of the church.


Lessons from the church in Asia

By A U.S. Catholic interview |
Article Your Faith

The editors of U.S. Catholic interview Claretian Father Samuel Canilang, the director of the Institute for Consecrated Life in Asia (ICLA) in Quezon City near Manila, Philippines.

The institute was founded by the Claretian Missionaries in 1997 and educates religious and lay students from all over Asia, offering degree programs in consecrated life, missiology, spirituality, and biblical ministry.


Pope Francis: An ecumenical perspective

By Meghan Murphy-Gill |
Article Your Faith

Whether by intention or not, Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio’s choice of a papal name has meaning not only for Catholics. St. Francis of Assisi is a widely recognized saint, known for his faith and humility. It’s not surprising that American Protestants also find him appealing.

“I think mainline Protestants are attracted to the same things Catholics are attracted to,” says David Heim, executive editor of the Christian Century. “He seems like such a living witness to the Good News of the gospel and living it out in practical ways.”


Mixed messages: What do women hear from the church?

By A U.S. Catholic interview |
Article Your Faith
Strong, active women have stood tall throughout Catholic history. So why is the church’s language about women still so inadequate?

From her kindergarten class in her hometown of Mobile, Alabama to her current position teaching at the University of San Diego, Emily Reimer-Barry has been in Catholic schools all her life. She credits this immersion in Catholic education with giving her the freedom to ask the big questions.


Priest to pope: Can we please just forget about that whole celibacy thing?

By Scott Alessi |
blog Your Faith

Pope Francis has not shied away from discussing the topic of celibacy in the priesthood, making it clear in the past that he is in favor of maintaining the current requirement (or at least "for the moment," as Francis himself put it). Some have speculated that Francis will eventually move for a change on celibacy, but one priest isn't interested in waiting around. 


For us and our salvation: Father Donald Senior on the passion

By A U.S. Catholic interview |
Article Your Faith
What do we mean when we say that by Jesus’ suffering and death we are healed—a mystery if ever there was one?

You might imagine that Father Donald Senior had always wanted to study the Bible, given that he is a world-renowned scripture scholar and a longtime member of the Pontifical Biblical Commission. But you’d be wrong; what he really wanted to be was a missionary.


35 years ago in U.S. Catholic: Don't pass over Exodus

Online Editor |
Article Your Faith

By Father Peter M.J. Stravinskas

This article appeared in the April 1979 issue of U.S. Catholic (Vol. 44, No. 4, pages 36-40).


‘Noah’ film sparks debate over one of the world’s oldest and most beloved stories

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Article Your Faith

c. 2014 Religion News Service

NEW YORK (RNS) In recent years, Hollywood has made a concerted effort to lure religious audiences to the local cineplex with such films as “The Passion of the Christ,” “Son of God” and even dark-horse hits like “Facing the Giants.” And most of the time, it’s worked.

But the upcoming Russell Crowe film “Noah” is stirring different emotions — even concern — as it touches on a beloved Bible story near and dear to people of several faiths.


What Julian of Norwich can teach us about prayer

By A U.S. Catholic interview |
Article Your Faith

After spending 20 years meditating on a number of visions, Julian of Norwich developed a deep understanding of God and produced her famous work, Revelations of Divine Love. Through her words, one can see the fruits of contemplative meditation.

While interviewing Father William Meninger on the topic of contemplative meditation for our November 2013 issue, we asked him what else we might learn from this 14th-century woman’s writings.


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