US Catholic Faith in Real Life

The literary genius of Bob Dylan

Dylan's Nobel Prize opens up room in the cathedral of literature for every genius who has seen a light and can find a way to make us see it, too.

By Danny Duncan Collum |
Article Culture

Putting aside, for a moment, the election of a reality TV star as president of the United States, history may ultimately judge that the most significant cultural event of 2016 was actually the awarding of the Nobel Prize for Literature to Bob Dylan. That decision, handed down by those ultimate high-culture deciders in Stockholm, finally ratified the ascension of the American popular arts that began in the music and movies of the 1930s, built to a crescendo in the 1960s, and has been the new normal for most people ever since.


‘The Young Pope’ in the age of Francis and Trump

The show portrays a hotly contested leadership transition and the possibility of an unchecked leader pushing a potentially unpopular set of priorities.

By Elizabeth Lefebvre |
Article Culture

For a show about the papacy, it’s hard to pinpoint the most shocking part of the first few minutes of The Young Pope: The fact that the episode came with a nudity warning that is almost immediately realized; the titular pope emerging from a pile of babies, which later turns out to be part of a dream sequence; or hearing an American pope addressing crowds at the Vatican (especially one played by British actor Jude Law).


The faith of an unarmed war hero

“Hacksaw Ridge” chronicles an unwavering faith lived out in midst of war's violence and gore.

By Kathleen Manning |
Article Culture
Hacksaw Ridge
Directed by Mel Gibson (Summit Entertainment, 2016)
 

A story of northern racism

In “The South Side,” Natalie Moore points out that while cultural diversity is worth celebrating, high-poverty black segregation is not.

By Rosie McCarty |
Article Culture
The South Side
By Natalie Y. Moore (St. Martin’s Press, 2016)

Women and Christian witness

“The Strength of Her Witness,” edited by Elizabeth Johnson, contains articles by women around the world on the importance of Christ’s incarnation.

By Emily Sanna |
Article Culture
The Strength of Her Witness: Jesus Christ in the Global Voices of Women
Edited by Elizabeth Johnson (Orbis Books, 2016)

“What difference do women’s voices make in interpreting the meaning of Jesus Christ?” asks Elizabeth Johnson in her introduction to The Strength of Her Witness. This book, edited by Johnson, attempts to answer that question.


The good and the bad of the ‘Gilmore Girls' revival

Pro: Emily Gilmore and Paris Geller. Con: Lorelai Gilmore hiking in the wilderness.

By Molly Jo Rose |
blog Culture

In the spirit of Rory Gilmore’s love of the pro/con list, this review of the long-awaited return of our favorite mother and daughter duo will take the same form. While I’ll refrain from quoting the final four words, references to it will take place as I assume most readers will have pulled a Lorelai and Rory and binged all four episodes over the weekend while eating pizza and Pop-Tarts.


Another reason to love ‘Gilmore Girls’

Lorelai and Rory Gilmore are proof that families are forged not by following social and cultural scripts, but by following the heart.

By Pamela Hill Nettleton |
Article Culture

Oh, to live in Stars Hollow, where crabby but hunky Luke runs the diner, quirky Kirk holds a long string of peculiar jobs, and a single mother and her daughter can be seen as a legitimate and respectable family.

On television and in film, single mothers are too often portrayed as hapless victims, struggling to raise children in the absence of a male breadwinner. Media’s single moms live in dismal apartments in gritty neighborhoods, dress in thrift-shop clothing, and seem wearily defeated by life. They have bad posture, bad hair, and bad luck. 


‘Alwasta’ speaks to fame and power

Rapper Oddisee's new album reflects on life as a Muslim American in a post-9/11 world.

By Nicholas Liao |
Article Culture

Sudanese American rapper Oddisee inhabits a delicate space in the star-obsessed rap world—bigger than underground, but not yet a household name. Still, the D.C.-born artist is on the rise, beloved by critics and hip-hop purists for his thoughtful, intricate rhymes and self-produced beats that recall the so-called golden age of rap. 


Anthony Weiner and the delusions of American politics

The Anthony Weiner saga forces us to ask questions about the state of our politics.

By Danny Duncan Collum |
Article Culture

The tradition of fly-on-the-wall documentaries about American political campaigns is a long and mostly honorable one. It starts in 1960 with Primary, which took newly-invented portable equipment behind the scenes with John F. Kennedy and Hubert Humphrey as they fought for the Democratic presidential nomination. And it runs all the way through By the People: The Election of Barack Obama (2009) and Mitt (2014). In between came the greatest of them all, The War Room


The Obamas: How it all began

‘Southside with You’ tells the story of Michelle and Barack Obama's first date and plants the seeds for all that comes after.

By Elizabeth Lefebvre |
Article Culture

After seeing Barack and Michelle Obama in the public eye for the last eight years, it can be difficult to think of them as anything other than the President and the First Lady. In Southside with You, we get a glimpse of a fictionalized retelling of their first date in Chicago during the summer of 1989. 


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