US Catholic Faith in Real Life

How long can you survive in extreme poverty?

By Kira Dault |
blog Justice

For many of us, poverty is largely an abstract concept. We relate to it in terms of dollars or percentages. (For example, 40 percent of people living in the United States will spend at least one year at or below the poverty line between the ages of 25 and 75.) But an organization called Live58 has released a game that brings home the way that poverty, for people who are living it, is not about numbers. It's about choices.

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Problems women face in a broken prison system

By Laura Fletcher |
Article Justice
One woman’s experience of incarceration exposed her to many of the issues emblematic of our country’s problems with prisons.

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The high prices of living in poverty

By Kevin Clarke |
Article Justice
Avoiding bad choices is a lot easier when you’re not living on a shoestring budget.

What is the cost of being poor in America? Researchers have long known that because of a broad reduction in retail and other consumer choices experienced by America’s poor, it is often simply more expensive to be poor in the United States. Food shopping when you are poor in America doesn’t mean taking the minivan out to Costco; it can mean walking to the only “supermarket” in the neighborhood, often a small corner retail operation with high markups on food and household supplies.

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Memories of the March: 10 voices recall 1963 March on Washington

Kira Dault |
Article Justice

c. 2013 Religion News Service

WASHINGTON (RNS) Religion News Service asked participants in the 1963 March on Washington to reflect on their lasting memories of the event and how it shaped their faith. Their comments have been edited for length and clarity.

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Welcoming the stranger: Immigrants deserve our support, not scrutiny

In Philadelphia, people of faith are stepping forward to defend the rights of their hardworking brothers and sisters.

By Paul Witte |
Article Justice

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is a city of great cultural diversity. I arrived here after working for 10 years with undocumented immigrants in Tennessee and Kentucky as a lay associate of the Glenmary Home Missioners. I knew I would continue to work with and for immigrants because of the profoundly deep experiences I had relating to them--that and the fact that I feel a deep connection with them being as I am the son of poor immigrants myself.

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Poverty comes to Wisteria Lane: Serving the new suburban poor

By Meghan Murphy-Gill |
Article Justice
Numbers of poor people in the suburbs are growing twice as fast as their city counterparts. But many of these picket-fence poor don’t know where to get help—or can’t bring themselves to ask.

When Ellen got the phone call from Hope House, a long-term homeless shelter in Villa Park, Illinois, confirming an available room, she was overcome with relief. “The tears just flowed,” she says. “Even the woman on the other end was crying.”

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Why homelessness shouldn't be a crime

By Paula Lomazzi |
Article Justice
Spending a night sleeping outside shouldn’t lead to a criminal record.

Sounding Boards are one person's take on a many-sided subject and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.

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