US Catholic Faith in Real Life

War gone viral

Violent conflicts around the world are a breeding ground for dangerous diseases.

By Kevin Clarke |
Article Justice
While the world’s focus has properly shifted to the plight of Syrian refugees pressing against Europe’s southern borders, the brutal conflict in Yemen has attracted far less attention. The conflict there, trudging into its second year, has proved a match with the Syrian civil war in terms of disregard for noncombatant immunity and wanton destruction of ancient sites and civilian infrastructure.
 

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Coming out Catholic

By Jeffrey Essmann |
Article Justice
I have no problem telling people I’m gay. But it can sometimes be weird telling people I’m a Catholic.

It’s said that coming out is a lifelong process. There are its initial, more dramatic phases, usually connected with firsts (though not necessarily in this order): when you first realize what your sexual feelings are, the first time you tell someone you’re gay, the first time you fall in love. The drama of each is essentially the same. It’s the existential drama of asserting yourself in the world, in your own life, and of saying, “This is who I am.”

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A Prayer For Our Daily Murder

By Brian Doyle |
Article Justice News

Frequent contributor Brian Doyle writes, furious and haunted and mourning, from Oregon, where nine people were murdered and 10 others crippled by a gun-toting assassin on October 1 at Umpqua Community College.

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On the eve of his beatification, a song for Oscar Romero

By Scott Alessi |
blog Justice

The iconic Archbishop Oscar Romero—long held high as an unofficial saint of the church—-will be officially beatified on May 23. Some supporters of Romero, including U.S. Catholic columnist Kevin Clarke, argue that Romero proceeding on the path to sainthood is long overdue. And others are just happy to celebrate the occasion. 

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When the rich get richer: The dangerous economics of inequality

By Anthony Walton |
Article Justice
The poorest 50 percent of Americans are struggling with flat or falling income levels, negligible net worth, and bleak prospects. How did this happen? And what can we do about it?

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Move over Olivia Pope—this is what real scandal looks like

By Meghan J. Clark |
Article Justice
When scandal looms, who are you going to call—Olivia Pope or Pope Francis?

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People dealing with homelessness respond to cruel tweets about them

By Caitlyn Schmid |
blog Justice

“If home is where the heart is, then are homeless people heartless?” This is one of several mean tweets against people experiencing homelessness that’s on a Canadian advocacy group’s website. Raising the Roof’s new and powerful PSA will get you to think twice before you tweet.

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Genomes 'R Us: Personalized patient medicine and the common good

By Sue Stanton |
blog Justice

Guest blog

From the first minute the self-absorbed man began to shrink in the 1950’s cult movie classic The Incredible Shrinking Man, I hoped one day that in addition to zooming into space where no man had gone before, we might begin exploring the multiple universes inside our bodies. 

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Undocumented failure: Why we must care for our immigrant brothers and sisters

The father, in his rage and grief, told me that this country did not care about his son who lay dying.

By Kira Dault |
Article Justice

Certain events in our lives get burned into our memories and become a part of us. Often these events happen at beginnings and endings: births and deaths. Perhaps because of the definitude of those moments, we recognize them as utterly important and crucial.

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Get to know a person living in poverty

By Michael Jordan Laskey |
Article Justice
Creating a culture of encounter requires more than just organizing drives. It might even mean learning a name or two.

About 10 years ago, during a college Christmas break, I spent a couple of days with a group of classmates at a Franciscan community of priests and brothers in the South Bronx. One night we packed a van with sandwiches and a tank of hot chocolate, and a friar named Brother Giuseppe drove us down to Lower Manhattan. We parked and unloaded at a street corner where the Franciscans spend time with the homeless all year round.

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