US Catholic Faith in Real Life

Did Jesus have brothers and sisters?

For centuries theologians have debated whether or not Jesus had any siblings. But what does scripture say about his complicated family tree?

By Meghan Murphy-Gill |
Article Your Faith

The only child often gets a bad rap. Stereotyped as entitled and self-important, people who grow up without siblings aren’t always looked upon favorably—especially by those of us with at least a sibling or two. Jesus may have acted like an only child at times in the gospels, but all of the four evangelists make some mention of his brothers and sisters.

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Why aren’t bishops elected?

Ordinary Catholics once played an important role in the selection of bishops. What changed?

By J. Peter Nixon |
Article Your Faith

In 374 the bishop of Milan’s death sparked a deep conflict over the election of his successor. Fearing a threat to public order, the local governor, a man named Ambrose, appeared at the cathedral to appeal for calm. His eloquence so impressed those assembled that they began to chant his name and demanded he become bishop. Ambrose would go on to become a doctor of the church and the man who baptized St. Augustine. 

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Do flags belong in Catholic churches?

Nothing in the church’s liturgical books or canon law regulates the display of flags in churches.

By Joel Schorn |
Article Your Faith

After September 11, 2001 and the subsequent war on terrorism, the American flag became more visible than at perhaps any other time in U.S. history. From car antennas to window decals to lapel buttons to commercials, it seems the flag is now everywhere. But what about in Catholic churches?

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What does it mean to be a Catholic in good standing?

Our status in the church shouldn't be relegated to a set of rules.

By Teresa Coda |
Article Your Faith

As the director of faith formation at a Catholic parish, I’m frequently asked questions about the logistics of the sacraments. Can I miss the confirmation service and still be confirmed? Do I need to prove I’ve gone to confession to receive the Eucharist? Can I doubt my faith and still partake in the sacraments? While these inquiries are easily answered (no, no, yes), I trip over my words every time I’m asked, “What does it mean to be a Catholic in good standing?”

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What is Pentecost?

The celebration of Pentecost began long before its appearance in Acts 2.

By David A. Pitt |
Article Your Faith

Heirloom wedding rings are powerful markers of personal heritage. Having one is a reminder of the family member with whom it originated (even if we never knew them) and the person(s) through whom it has passed. But for its original owner, it was not an heirloom at all but rather a symbol of their marriage covenant with a particular person. Only as that ring becomes an heirloom, passed on from person to person, does its meaning shift. No longer just a wedding ring, it increasingly becomes a symbol of ever widening family connections.

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Is the right to private property limited?

All people have both the right and moral responsibility when it comes to the things they own.

By Jacob Kohlhaas |
Article Your Faith

Catholic social teaching’s defense of private property traces all the way back to Pope Leo XIII’s 1891 Rerum Novarum (On Capital and Labor). Today, however, given anxieties over data, privacy, and digital rights, Leo’s concern for “land and chattels” seems quaint. Thankfully, Catholic social teaching in the 20th century has a growing understanding that what private property is is less important than what private property does. Used rightly, private property secures and improves the lives of its owners and society at large.

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What was Jesus like as a child?

The gospels leave us desiring a host of details about Jesus’ early life.

By Alice Camille |
Article Your Faith

How did you get to be who you are? It’s a question we ask of those who impress us. It’s also a question that fuels most criminal biopics. We want to know how exceptional souls get from there to there. Experience indicates that who we are now has something to do with where we’ve been.

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Should you read the Bible from start to finish?

Rarely is there only one way to do something.

By Alice Camille |
Article Your Faith

Rarely is there only one way to do something. When it comes to exploring scripture, resist Bible fascists who insist their way is correct. Your best approach is influenced by a lot of factors, including context, time, and personality. Are you engaging this project alone or in a study group? Are you committed across a lifetime or compressing your effort into a single semester? Are you fierce about your goals, or do you tend to quit at the first obstacle?

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Must we call the persons of the Trinity Father, Son, and Holy Spirit?

No matter the particular names you choose, the core message of the Trinity remains unchanging.

By Teresa Coda |
Article Your Faith

One of the paradoxes of our Catholic faith is that its foundational element, belief in the Trinity, the flour to the bread of Catholicism, cannot be understood through human reason. The mysteriousness of the Trinity, however, hasn’t stopped the church from spending centuries examining and clarifying its doctrine. The core elements of the Trinity are described in no uncertain terms: God is only one, but exists in three distinct persons. The divine persons do not share one divinity but are each wholly and entirely God, existing in relationship with one another.

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Where do the sacraments come from?

There weren’t always only seven sacraments.

By David A. Pitt |
Article Your Faith

One summer afternoon, driving past a cemetery, I saw six bikers talking, laughing, and drinking beer, their motorcycles parked nearby. My initial indignation was transformed upon noticing a solitary beer can on a headstone. The bikers had not simply pulled off the road for a quick drink on a hot day but were reconnecting with a now-deceased friend.

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