US Catholic Faith in Real Life

This November, live out this spiritual work of mercy

How to teach your kids to show up for those who are sorrowful.

By Annemarie Scobey |
Article Lifestyle

Beginning with All Saints’ Day and ending with the final leaves falling off the trees before winter, November is a fitting reminder that death is part of the cycle of life. During this month, many churches invite their parishioners to put pictures of deceased loved ones on display. November—somber, gray, and serious—calls us to reflect on how we can bring comfort to those in our midst who have suffered a loss. “Comfort the sorrowful” is one of the seven spiritual works of mercy.

Advertisement


Let Catherine of Siena find her way into your Toyota Sienna

‘Be who God meant you to be and you will set the world on fire.’

By Annemarie Scobey |
Article Your Faith

St. Catherine of Siena. Our Toyota Sienna minivan has an extra “n,” and on our busiest days I could be known as Annemarie of Sienna. (I did not include “Saint” before my name.) But I admired St. Catherine of Siena long before I needed three rows of seats to transport our family. 

St. Catherine of Siena said, “Be who God meant you to be and you will set the world on fire.” 

Advertisement


Playing guns: Kids being kids or something to worry about?

How should parents react when toddlers start ‘playing guns’?

By Jennon Bell Hoffmann |
Article Lifestyle

On a recent afternoon, as I pushed my toddler on a swing, I watched a pair of 8-year-old boys chase each other with sticks, yelling “Bang! You’re dead! I shot you!” It was so commonplace that the scene didn’t register as anything uneasy until an hour later, when I learned of yet another shooting on the evening news; sadly, also commonplace. It struck me that in a few years, I’ll be sending my toddler to school, where she’ll learn duck-and-cover and active shooter drills.

Advertisement


The good enough family

The family photos we show to the world on social media or Christmas cards don’t show the true state of family life.

By Catherine O'Connell-Cahill |
Article Lifestyle

No one wants to admit to having mice, because they think it reflects badly on their housekeeping skills. As if the mice are outside saying, “Hey, did you see that? They dropped a crumb on their kitchen floor. Let’s get in there!”

Advertisement


Catholics have not cornered the market on truth

There’s a piece of truth in Catholicism, but that doesn’t diminish the truth found in other religions.

By Annemarie Scobey |
Article Your Faith

When our son Liam, now 20, was in second grade, I have a clear memory of his focus on Catholicism. It was the year of his first communion, and in his Catholic school discussions of the faith, sacraments, and the connection to his life permeated every activity. 

Advertisement


Can anyone be a godparent?

Godparents used to pay a much more prominent role in new Catholics’ faith formation.

By Father James Field |
Article Your Faith

Our culture subscribes to some notions of “godparent” that don’t exactly advance the pastoral plan of the church for this essential ministry. Even people who are unaffiliated or neutral in matters of religion often ask someone dear to them to be a godparent for a newborn. Sometimes it’s a way of affirming a longtime friend. It may also be a way of identifying who among the parents’ extended family might care for their child should calamity strike.

Advertisement


Faithful parenting means getting creative now and then

Steering children in a positive direction often requires thinking outside the box.

By Annemarie Scobey |
Article Your Faith

When Katie and Kevin’s son Matthew was 2, Katie was concerned that he was getting lost in between his older brother Bennett and his baby sister Annabelle. “He was a huge challenge. I couldn’t seem to connect with him the way I did with Bennett. He was so impulsive and emotional,” Katie says. She feared that Matthew’s difficulty could lead to a relationship fraught with issues. She decided that the way to steer him to a more attached and positive relationship was through time set aside just for him.

Advertisement


Everyone deserves a Catholic education, regardless of means

Helping young people become followers of Christ means making Catholic education accessible to all.

By Annemarie Scobey |
Article Lifestyle

“Why do you send your boys to a Catholic school?” my sons’ pediatrician asked, looking at the St. Monica school sweatshirts and uniform pants my two boys had strewn over the floor of the examining room. It was the boys’ yearly checkup, in 2002, and they sat expectantly in their Hot Wheels underwear as their doctor walked in. 

Advertisement


Taking attendance after loss

This August, don’t forget parents who have lost their children.

By Jessie Bazan |
Article Lifestyle

It’s that time of year when the parental back-to-school glow lights up playgrounds and parking lots. I drive past an elementary school every day on my way to work. Moms and dads drop off their children, beaming with a loving mix of pride, joy, and relief. We are back to the routine! Just think of all my son will learn! Imagine all the ways my daughter will grow this year! 

The scene is full of hope—and, for many, heartache. 

What about the parents whose children are not going back to school ever? 

Advertisement


Forget apologies, give the sign of peace instead

A sign of peace, genuinely given, brings Christ into a situation.

By Annemarie Scobey |
Article Lifestyle Your Faith

I’ve always liked the sign of peace. As a child, it was my favorite part of our all-school liturgies. The sign of peace provided an excuse to move around a little—to stretch across pews and vigorously shake hands with as many classmates as I could before the teacher reined us in for the Lamb of God. In college, when I attended daily Mass at Marquette University’s tiny Joan of Arc Chapel, the sign of peace was a chance to hug a friend who had an exam the next day or a roommate whose mom was ill. 

Advertisement


Pages