US Catholic Faith in Real Life

Game of loans: How can we address the college debt dilemma?

By Scott Alessi |
blog Justice

If you’ve graduated from college in the last 10 years, odds are you’re still paying for that education. As the cost of college has soared, so too have the number of loans being taken by students to pay their tuition. More than 70 percent of the class of 2015 graduated with student loan debt, at an average of $35,000 per student. And for most recent grads, that’s not an easy amount to pay off—even with a college degree.


How prevalent is the hook-up culture on college campuses?

By Kerry Weber |
Article Lifestyle

Anxious college freshmen and concerned parents alike may wonder: Just how prevalent is the oft-debated “hook-up culture” on college campuses? After two years surveying students at Catholic colleges about culture and relationships, Jason King, associate professor of theology at St. Vincent College in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, has an answer. Yes, he says, it’s out there—but not because today’s young Catholics long for the days of free love.


A price worth paying? 'Ivory Tower' and the value of a college degree

By Danny Duncan Collum |
Article Lifestyle
As student loan debt surpasses U.S. credit card debt, documentaries ask the tough questions about a college education.

For at least the past 30 years, since the blue-ribbon report A Nation at Risk sounded an alarm about America’s underachieving school kids, the American middle class has been obsessed with education, from kindergarten to grad school, as the key to its children’s futures. As college tuition costs skyrocketed during those years, the high price only seemed to make the product more desirable.


The dish on school lunches

By Caitlyn Schmid |
blog Lifestyle

Schools lunches have been served up in the news a lot recently.

As most children anxiously anticipate summer vacation—a time to sleep in, go biking with friends, camp, and avoid anything having to do with homework—others dread the last dismissal bell. Those who rely on the routine of receiving breakfast and lunch at school are found without easily accessible nutrition and live in uncertainty of where their next meal is coming.


Does the Common Core force schools to compromise their Catholic identity?

By Scott Alessi |
blog Lifestyle

As the school year winds down and children start looking ahead to summer vacation, the heated debate about the national Common Core standards shows no signs of letting up. But while the debate in public (and some private) schools revolves mostly around the question of whether or not the standards are the right way to go when it comes to giving students the best possible education, Catholic school parents are debating a different issue.


Catholic teachers say "No" to new contract clause

By Caitlyn Schmid |
blog Justice

In lieu of the many recent instances where employees of Catholic institutions—ranging from food pantry workers to teachers—were forced to leave their positions, some employees have willingly made the decision not to renew their work contracts due to conflicts in belief.


How is hook-up culture affecting college students?

By A U.S. Catholic interview |
Article Lifestyle

In our May 2014 issue, the editors at U.S. Catholic interviewed theologian Emily Reimer-Barry, professor of theology at the University of San Diego about the messages women receive from the church. Here, she talks more about some of the challenges her students face regarding hook-up culture, and the implications for young people and the church.


Student loans affect more than just your wallet

By Caitlyn Schmid |
blog Lifestyle

I know firsthand how hard it can be. It’s a daily struggle that now affects 1 in 5 American households. It affects your every decision. It’s a crippling feeling felt deep in the pit of your stomach. It keeps you up at night. As the student loan debt of America has crept over $1 trillion and many millennials expect to spend decades to pay for college, the problem with student loans is not going away any time soon.


How Catholic colleges can and should help DREAMers

By Donna M. Carroll |
Article Justice
One university president shares tips on how to welcome and support undocumented students.

My involvement with immigration reform started with one student on a bicycle in a snow storm. How else, I learned, could he get to school without a driver’s license, which was not an option for an undocumented student in Illinois in 2007? Neither was a campus job, though he was an honors student majoring in economics. He asked for my help, tentatively at first—not for himself, but for the dream of citizenship—and so it all began.


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