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Agree
7% (131 votes)
Disagree
93% (1816 votes)
Total votes: 1947
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Comments

Submitted by John Rondina (not verified) on

Most Catholics need to get their heads out of the sand.

Presently there are 34 authorized forms of the Mass/Liturgy, 11 in the West & 23 in the East.

The Roman Rite has 4 authorized Masses.
A.Ordinary.
B.Extraordinary.
C.Anglican Use. In olde English. Only in the USA.
d.Neocatechumenal.

Vatican II declared all rites equal.

John

Submitted by sekman (not verified) on

The Latin mass in no way undermines the unity of the church. You stupid liberal catholic bigots do more to undermine the unity of the church than anyone else. This poll and the article it corresponds with are an attribution to US Catholic's great ignorance. Get a clue!

Submitted by Dennis Egan (not verified) on

Rite is a tool to inspire a closer relationship with GOD. Different rites should be used for different groups to achieve that relationship. Forcing a form of worship upon someone either because of tradition or because its progressive are equally damaging.

It seems like our church is abandoning our young people who generally find more progressive forms more inspiring. In our diocese youth programs that develop conscience and ideals are being discontinued in favor of programs that demand what you should think.

One final thought, do we really think it matters to God how we worship him if our worship is from our soul? Is the ritual really important to GOD? If the ritual is more important than pastoral concerns than it is descending perilously close to being treated like magic.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

"It seems like our church is abandoning our young people who generally find more progressive forms more inspiring."
Sorry, friend, but all of the young Catholics I know are devotees of traditional liturgy. The Catholic youth who took up the mantle of progressivism in the 60s and 70s barely exist in this generation; most of my peers don't even bother to try and fit liturgy and their faith into the paradigm of what they feel is culturally acceptable, they just leave the Church. Who is left? people who arn't ashamed to be Catholic, who love everything about the faith, including its rich traditions. Fidelity to the truth is not a problem for us.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

Dear Anonymous,

YES!!!! As a young Catholic, I agree!!!!

Submitted by Dan, USAF (not verified) on

To sharpen the point: the "inspiring," "uplifting," "relevant," & "progressive" forms do not beget priestly vocations. Look in our seminaries today and I understand that 9 out of 10 would not identify themselves (primarily) with the above adjectives.

The new seminarians and priests are not simply throwbacks, though. There is something subtly different which their seniors cannot appreciate in their own uninformed rigidity-- they are survivors of a protracted culture war wishing to heal rather than intensify the pain. Because of that, they are integrators, evangelists, and teachers. They also use the all tools of the faith: Sacred Scripture, Sacred Tradition, sacramental theology, patristics, history, music, web pages. The new priest in my parish is working on an evening MBA on top of his seminary degree and previous graduate education. He speaks of seminary education (but not necessarily seminary formation or pastoral education) being outstanding nowadays.

Their numbers are small and they are working dreadfully hard, but they are changing life in my parish. In the next 10 - 20 years as the become pastors and then bishops, it will be a completely different Church here in the United States, at least.

This priest, born about 20 years after the council, says the Latin Mass which he "never knew" on an about-monthly basis.

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on

I am 38 years old and almost no one that I went to Catholic grammar or high school with still goes to Mass. Those of us who grew up after Vatican II have abandoned the Faith in such large numbers that we scarcely still exist in the Church. There are almost more young families in my Extraordinary Form parish than there were in the last THREE Ordinary Form parishes my wife and I belonged to COMBINED! Plus, the young families in my current parish have more than 1 or 2 children. I agree with an earlier poster that demographics will end this argument in the next 50 years as OF Catholics abort and contraception themselves out of existence.

Submitted by Richard Hargreaves (not verified) on

The resurgence of the Latin Mass is a force for unity in the Church because it helps to bring back into the fold many of those have been on the margins in recent decades.

Submitted by Richard Hargreaves (not verified) on

The resurgence of the Latin Mass is a force for unity in the Church because it helps to bring back into the fold many of those have been on the margins in recent decades.

Submitted by Clinton (not verified) on

I am fortunate to be in a parish that offers both forms of the Roman Rite
as part of the regular schedule. How can it be divisive to offer the full
expression of the Rite? Yes, I prefer to attend one form. I'm sure everyone
has a preference when given the choice. However, those times when I attend the other form of the Mass I notice plenty of familiar faces --
I'm not alone in not attending one form exclusively. But if I did, what
would be wrong with that? Either way, I am going to a Mass in my Rite.

I think the author of this article is seeing divisions where none exist.
In my parish we are served by the same priests, worry about the same
roof, contribute to the same building fund, have the same Scout Troop,
volunteer for the same St. Vincent de Paul Society, maintain the same
parochial school, and worship the same God at the same altar. This
talk of division is, well, silly.

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