Feminism and hook-up culture

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Sex and Sexuality Women Young Adults

As a feminist, how do you react to sexualized theme parties?

I found out about theme parties when I was teaching a course on women and spirituality.

We were discussing how restricting images of God to masculine language and images affects society whether you believe in God or not. One student raised her hand and she said, "Men make themselves into gods at the parties on campus."

I asked her what she meant and she said, "Oh, you know, ‘pimps and ho's' [whores], ‘CEOs and office ho's,' ‘maids and millionaires.' "


Intimate conversations: How to talk to your kids about sex

By Liz DeCarlo| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family Sex and Sexuality Young Adults

Tami Hollendonner remembers the extent of her sex education as a Catholic teen in the 1970s. "My mom and dad never told me about the birds and the bees. There was no talk about birth control or why not to have sex," says the 42-year-old mother of two from Darien, Illinois. "The message was that you didn't do it. It was pounded into you-God said you didn't do it, so you didn't."


Sex, lies, and hook-up culture

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Sex and Sexuality Young Adults
It seems that easy sex is rampant on college campuses today, but new research reveals that students really want romance.

When Donna Freitas offered a class on dating and spirituality at St. Michael’s College in Vermont, she didn’t know her students would want to change the social scene at the Catholic liberal arts school. But when they learned that none of them liked the culture of casual sex on campus, they decided to create a newspaper discussing “hook-up culture” and got the whole school talking about it.


Sex, lies, and hook-up culture

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Sex and Sexuality Young Adults
It seems that easy sex is rampant on college campuses today, but new research reveals that students really want romance.

When Donna Freitas offered a class on dating and spirituality at St. Michael’s College in Vermont, she didn’t know her students would want to change the social scene at the Catholic liberal arts school. But when they learned that none of them liked the culture of casual sex on campus, they decided to create a newspaper discussing “hook-up culture” and got the whole school talking about it.


Recovering Catholics

By Vincent Gragnani| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Spirituality Young Adults
We can learn a lot from people who left the church, whether we can win them back or not.

For generations, the Baltimore Catechism taught that Catholics who miss Sunday Mass through their own fault commit a mortal sin, making the soul an enemy of God, depriving it of the right to everlasting happiness in heaven, and making it fit for everlasting punishment in hell.


Pray your own way

By Christina Capecchi| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Spirituality Young Adults
These aren't your grandma's devotions. Young adult Catholics are using non-traditional ways to get in touch with their spiritual side.

It's 11 p.m., and 31-year-old Tara Turner is wearing cotton pajamas, lying on her bed, deep in prayer. Her hands aren't folded; they're clasping a pink Game Boy.

As she digs to the center of the earth, attacking monsters en route, Turner communes with God.

"I pray as I play," she says. "When you've got your fingers and your eyes focused on this little critter on the screen, then your mind is more open to hearing God."


Welcome to the church wide web

By Matt Bigelow| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Young Adults
Thou shalt not stop ordinary Catholics from using the Internet to speak their minds.

When Genevieve Kineke and a group of laywomen decided this year to celebrate the 20th anniversary of Mulieris Dignitatem, Pope John Paul II’s document on the dignity of women, she needed to get the word out. A mailing list, however, never even occurred to her.


A theology of call -- How to be Good News to others

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Young Adults

Sister Catherine Bertrand, S.S.N.D. entered religious life on a dare. "It was either that or the Peace Corps." After 25 years she continues to be surprised by all that her life has to offer, and she dares all Christians to respond to the gospel call to fidelity and commitment--whether they are single, married, religious men and women, or ordained priests.

According to Bertrand, every vocation involves asking yourself the questions, "How are you Good News to others? How do you bring life? And how do you share that life?"


Does the church put faith in our youth?

By Lisa Calderone-Stewart| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Young Adults

Our churches are filled with potential youth leaders. They might sit a few pews over from you at Sunday Mass. They might live in your neighborhood. You might know their parents.

But to Marie, a high school senior, it seems that you just don't care: "I don't think my parish values teenagers at all. Some do, and that's really encouraging. But the majority of adults don't really care what teenagers do. They probably think we're all bad." This perception is fairly widespread among young people.


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