Go ahead, be a burden to your adult children

By Patrick Lynch| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family Seniors
Parents put a great deal of effort into caring for their kids. When the time comes, it’s OK to let them return the favor.

My father came home from his service in the Marines in the South Pacific to marry the redheaded girl of his dreams, whom he’d met at St. Francis De Sales in the fifth grade. She’d written to him daily and he’d written her back, making plans for the future they hoped for together. They moved into an apartment over a funeral home in Detroit and he went to mortuary school, working evenings while she began to raise the inevitable family.


Put in a good word

By Patrick Gallagher| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Seniors Spirituality
If a eulogy sounds to good to be true, it probably is. Putting on rose-colored glasses to look at a loved one’s life, however, might be just what we need for resolution.

Recently I attended the wake and funeral for the father of a friend. At the wake, the children—now all middle-aged—took turns talking about their dad. They spoke with affection about his love for their mother and his devout faith.


Put in a good word

By Patrick Gallagher| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Seniors Spirituality
If a eulogy sounds to good to be true, it probably is. Putting on rose-colored glasses to look at a loved one’s life, however, might be just what we need for resolution.

Recently I attended the wake and funeral for the father of a friend. At the wake, the children—now all middle-aged—took turns talking about their dad. They spoke with affection about his love for their mother and his devout faith.


Death-it's a part of life

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Seniors Spirituality
Myles Sheehan has two jobs that cause him to walk with death on a regular basis: One, he's a doctor specializing in the care of old people; two, he's a Jesuit priest. He's also an Irish Catholic from Boston, where wakes constitute a hefty portion of one's social activities from childhood onward. So it isn't altogether surprising that when he speaks about what makes a good death, people listen.

Don't miss the second half

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Seniors
As he's entered middle age, Franciscan Father Richard Rohr, who has been riding the spirituality circuit for more than 30 years, has started to think about life in halves : the first dedicated to establishing boundaries and a sense of self in one's own group, the second to opening oneself to a more universal vision of the world.

At the hour of our death

By Martin E Marty| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Seniors Spirituality

Even death cannot rob us of our fundamental dignity as human persons. -From the U.S. bishops' Reflections on the Body, Cremation, and Catholic Funeral Rites

Burying the dead is a corporal work of mercy because Christians care for the bodies of humans-even though they are deceased. "The dead deserve as respectful a burial as can be provided, this is a minimum," says Father Richard Rutherford of the University of Portland.


Internal medicine: End of life ethics with Dr. Daniel Sulmasy, O.F.M.

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ethic of Life Faith and Science Spirituality
The debate about death with dignity needs the wisdom of the Catholic spiritual tradition, says this physician and bioethicist.

Seniors need some class: Let's have religious ed for our church elders

By John J. Donovan| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Seniors
Jesus taught adults, so why are parishes so focused on educating young children when the older members could really use the lessons? 

Sounding Boards are one person's take on a many-sided subject and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


Sometimes I feel like a motherless child: Dealing with death years later

By Maryann McCullough| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family Spirituality Women
Absence makes the heart yearn for a father's ear and a mother's lap.

It is in the natural order of things: Parents die and their children live on after them. If it happens and those parents are themselves young, it feels especially heartbreaking for the newly fractured family. Where will the father be to walk his daughter down the aisle? Where will the mother be when her first grandchild is born?


Voices from the debate: The church on end-of-life care

By Heather Grennan Gary| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ethic of Life
While Catholic moral teaching on medical treatment has been in place for hundreds of years, the last three decades have seen increased development and debate.

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