Tips for connecting to a loved one with Alzheimer’s

By Wendy Donahue| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ethic of Life Seniors

As a child, Laura Anthony visited her grandmother, who had Alzheimer’s, every weekend after Mass.

“As a kid I never knew what to talk about,” she says. “It was so awkward.”

Years later, after her mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, Anthony drove most weekends from Bradenton, Florida to provide care and company for her mom and dad in Citrus County.


Sister Joan Chittister on freedom in our later years

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Article Seniors Spirituality
As we grow older, we no longer need to “fit in” but are free to be ourselves and explore new ideas.

“Old age,” the Austrian novelist Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach wrote, “transfigures or fossilizes.”


You can't take it with you: Estate planning with a conscience

By Laura Fletcher| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Seniors Social Justice
None of us want to think of the world going on without us. But if we plan wisely, we can help to leave it a better place for the next generation.

For Charlie Krystofiak, the reasons for including his Catholic school in his will are personal. When he was growing up in 1950s San Francisco, his father didn’t want him to attend parochial school. So his homemaker mother became one of the only women on the block to work a day job so that Charlie and his brother could attend St. Ignatius College Preparatory School.


Embracing life's second act: Getting older with grace

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Seniors Spirituality
Aging gracefully requires the courage to face our burdens, to accept our blessings, and to recreate our lives in new ways.

Resources for getting the most out of retirement

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Seniors

Looking at aging and retirement from a strictly biological or financial viewpoint could make anyone fearful. Thankfully there’s plenty of assistance available to help retirees see the bigger picture, from volunteer opportunities to spiritual guidance to inspirational films. Here are some resources that remind us of the greater questions.

On the web

Catholic Senior Spirit
Ann and Deacon Jim Cavera’s site offers page after page of wisdom.


Finding the good life in retirement

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ethic of Life Seniors
Retirement may seem like a long vacation, but making the most of those post-career years still takes plenty of hard work.

Do you have faith in your vote?

By Heather Grennan Gary| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics
Catholics are valued voters for the candidates because they take their faith and their role in democracy seriously. In a 2008 U.S. Catholic survey, though, readers reveal that faith can lead voters in very different directions.

The 25-year itch: Empty nesters and the second half of marriage

By Wendy Donahue| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family
Divorce has doubled for couples over 50. Empty nesters share tales from the brink.

Even before Dick and Irene Reimbold’s younger daughter left for college, they were living what they call “the married single lifestyle” in Macomb, Michigan.

They owned a tax preparation business together. They attended Mass together. They slept separately and scarcely spoke, even at work.

“We went for over seven years without physical, sexual relations,” Dick says.

“There was nothing dramatic or traumatic,” Irene says about the deep disconnect. “It was a slow bleed.”


Empty nest? Now what? Tips for maintaining a marriage after the kids have gone

By Wendy Donahue| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family

This story accompanies The 25-year-itch: Empty nesters and the second half of marriage.)

David and Claudia Arp, founders of Marriage Alive and authors of The Second Half of Marriage (Zondervan), don’t fault couples for feeling drained when the last child leaves home.

“You’ve just survived the adolescent years,” Claudia says. Plus, says David, “The tendency is to get busy and avoid facing the challenges of this new stage of marriage.”


First aid for the second half of marriage

By Wendy Donahue| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family

(This story accompanies The 25-year-itch: Empty nesters and the second half of marriage.)

One way to sustain a marriage through the second half is to keep generating life as a couple, says Mary Jo Pedersen. Have a mission, whether it’s neighborhood cleanup, political campaigning, or mentoring other couples. “Nurture life; protect life in some way together.”


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