Only you? Shattering the myth of a soul mate

By Christine B. Whelan| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family

Recently my friend Angela called me in tears. Angela, 31, and her husband have been married for three years, and they are very well-suited: They can spend hours talking and laughing, are attracted to each other, get along with each other's friends and families, and agree on faith, politics, and financial matters. But recently, she told me, the "glow" had worn off. They were busy with their careers, and in moments of exhaustion each said some hurtful things to the other.


Help wanted: Surviving the spiritual challenges of unemployment

By Marcia Froelke Coburn| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Spirituality
Surviving the spiritual challenges of unemployment

 

When Marilyn Jansen thought about re-entering the job market, she was filled with dread. Years ago Jansen, 50, had left her travel-heavy career of selling computer software to hospitals to concentrate on raising her family. Since then she had also started a small gourmet food business, but now she felt the need for a significant change.


Help wanted: Surviving the spiritual challenges of unemployment

By Marcia Froelke Coburn| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Spirituality
Surviving the spiritual challenges of unemployment

 

When Marilyn Jansen thought about re-entering the job market, she was filled with dread. Years ago Jansen, 50, had left her travel-heavy career of selling computer software to hospitals to concentrate on raising her family. Since then she had also started a small gourmet food business, but now she felt the need for a significant change.


Reach out and tweet someone: U.S. Catholic readers on social media

By Elizabeth Lefebvre| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family Parish Life Spirituality
For U.S. Catholic  readers, social media creates an easy way to remain linked in to friends, family, and God.

American parents: Exhausted and unhappy

By Ruth Graham| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family

It would be easy to dismiss the struggle to reconcile a work life with a family life as universal. In some ways, however, this is a uniquely American problem: Recent surveys suggest Americans are significantly less satisfied with their ability to balance work and family than residents of other comparable nations. It’s not hard to figure out why:


Family matters: Do workplace policies make it harder to have kids?

By Ruth Graham| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family
Parenting can be a costly, time-consuming endeavor. Can the church help make American workplaces more family-friendly?

Brookes Ebetsch took only a long weekend off work after giving birth to her daughter in Texas in 2011. Her employer didn’t offer paid leave, and she and her husband couldn’t afford to take the financial hit of having her take weeks off. Her daughter, Sabina, arrived on a Thursday and Ebetsch was back at work on Monday.


So what about that yoga practice?

By Heather Grennan Gary| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ecumenical & Interfaith Dialogue Spirituality
Ten ways to determine if a practice is compatible with your Catholic faith.

Just because a spiritual practice comes from outside the Christian tradition doesn’t automatically mean it conflicts with church teaching—nor does it automatically mean the opposite. If you’re not so sure about your son’s meditation practice, your friend’s devotion to reiki, or if you can, in good faith, take that yoga class, your goal should be to wisely discern the answer.  


Thinking about drawing from other religions? Here are some tips to get you started

By Heather Grennan Gary| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ecumenical & Interfaith Dialogue Spirituality

Susan Pudelek spent two decades working in interreligious contexts, including a stint on the staff of the Council for the Parliament of the World’s Religions. In her current work as director of pilgrimage ministry at the Shrine of Our Lady of Pompeii in Chicago, she oversees occasional interreligious workshops and events. For those who want to learn about or participate in practices of other religions, she offers these guidelines.

1. The more grounded you are in your own religion, the more you have to offer others.


Spiritual exercises: Can other religious practices strengthen your Catholic core?

By Heather Grennan Gary| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ecumenical & Interfaith Dialogue Spirituality
Catholics searching for ways to experience their faith in both body and soul often look to other religious practices. But do they stretch their faith too thin?

Christine French attends Mass every Sunday, sings in the choir, volunteers with Vacation Bible School, and participates in a Bible study. She’s also a committed yogi who, whenever she’s in her hometown of Omaha, makes a beeline to her favorite yoga studio.


What’s God got to do with it? Keeping the faith in times of suffering

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Prayer and Sacraments Spirituality
This Jesuit had to confront what he believed about God and suffering when his sister became a quadriplegic. But the letters of comfort were what really threw him for a loop.

At dawn on his birthday, October 24, 1988, Father Richard Leonard’s phone rang. It was his mother, telling him that his sister Tracey had been in a terrible car accident. Her neck broken and her spine crushed, Tracey became a quadriplegic at age 28.


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