Proud to be an American Catholic

Megan Sweas| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics

 UPDATE: The U.S. Catholic editors shared their reflections on being American Catholics last year. This year, we've asked readers to submit their own reflections. Please send 200-500 word reflections to onlineeditor@uscatholic.org by July 6. The best submissions will appear on our blog.


Take your time

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Spirituality
For everything there is a season and a time for every purpose under heaven.

On goes the alarm: 6 a.m. thirteen minutes of news, weather, and traffic. 6:13. Out of bed, into the shower. First sip of coffee. Pack lunch, make breakfast, finish coffee, brush teeth.

Here comes the bus--uncharacteristically on time. Nod to the driver. Nice to be early to work.


Resources for managing your money faithfully

By Tim Carnahan| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice Spirituality
If you want to live out your faith through the spending, giving, and investing of your funds, take a look at these resources.

Spending wisely

The Next Progressive Era
Read more from Catholic Ray Boshara about the ideals of entrepreneurship, stewartship, and thrift.

Sabbath Economics
Money management from a biblical perspective


Thea-logy: Memories of Thea Bowman

By Charlene Smith, F.S.P.A.| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Spirituality
Being Sister Thea Bowman's friend was a study in living joyfully every day.

Two decades ago a remarkable woman died. The New York Times carried her obituary; the Jackson, Mississippi NBC affiliate televised her funeral; Mike Wallace had featured her on 60 Minutes two years before she died. And she was my friend.


Catholic workers: How you can get to work

By Meghan Murphy-Gill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice

Inspired by the people featured in our Catholic workers story, but still can't think of where you might want to get involved? The U.S. Catholic editors are here to help. We've compiled a list of different ways any old average Catholic can put their faith to work.

Already a regular volunteer? We'd love to hear about what you're doing in our comment section!


Catholic workers

By Michelle Bearden| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
These people of faith are volunteering outside the box when it comes to serving those in need. Read on to learn how they are putting their faith to work and find out how you can get started doing the same.  

Linda Smith: Teaching English to immigrants

Donald Douglas: Providing health care for the uninsured


Linda Smith: Teaching English to immigrants

By Michelle Bearden| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Hispanic Catholics Immigration

When Ed Smith retired from his law practice, he and his wife, Linda, dreamed of all the things they would do.

But three months later, he was diagnosed with cancer. And five months after that, he died.

Linda Smith went from planning their long-awaited trip to Italy to organizing her beloved husband's funeral.

"You think you have all the time in the world," says Smith, 61. "Then you realize just how precious every moment is. There are no guarantees."


Donald Douglas: Providing health care for the uninsured

By Michelle Bearden| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice

For nearly 40 years gastroenterologist Donald Douglas of Lewisburg, Pennsylvania practiced medicine in the traditional way. He worked in comfortable medical suites and hospitals with access to the best equipment that technology offered. Most of his patients had insurance coverage that allowed them to pursue the treatment they needed.

He could have retired from his profession, never stepping outside his comfort zone.


Sharyn Gildea: Making rosaries from flowers

By Michelle Bearden| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Spirituality

Six years ago, Sharyn Gildea descended to the darkest place a mother could possibly go.

David, her handsome, sweet son, plagued by depression and drugs, hanged himself at age 26. He left behind a young daughter named Ely and a broken-hearted mother.

"You're not sure how you will survive something like this," Gildea says, divorced and the mother of two other grown children.

She found her strength in God-and in rosaries. Not just praying rosaries, but making them out of dried flowers from life's milestones, such as funerals, weddings, and anniversaries.


James McLaughlin: Filing taxes for the poor

By Michelle Bearden| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice

Nobody likes to do taxes. That includes James McLaughlin, a Chicago-based attorney with the firm Kirkland & Ellis.

But there's an upside to the process, especially when you're doing those taxes gratis for people who need assistance with the complicated forms but can't afford it.

"When you tell someone he's getting a refund of $3,000, he gives you a smile that lights up the sky," McLaughlin, 31, says. "It's a wonderful thing to be able to deliver news like that."


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