Mothers' helper

By Katherine Jacobs| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Hispanic Catholics Immigration Social Justice
Stephanie Garza, a young new leader in the church, creates leaders out of Chicago moms.

Fault lines

By J.D. Long-García| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Immigration
The immigration debate comes home to Catholic parishes

She brought her children here from her country because she feared gangs would kill them.

“I left because of the delinquency of El Salvador. The situation there is very delicate. A mother has instincts toward her children, and, well, I saw a very dangerous future for them,” Maria Ayala says.

The Salvadoran civil war—which killed some 70,000 from 1980 to 1992, including San Salvador Archbishop Oscar Romero—spawned gang violence by groups like Mara Salvatrucha.


Fault lines

By J.D. Long-García| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Immigration
The immigration debate comes home to Catholic parishes

She brought her children here from her country because she feared gangs would kill them.

“I left because of the delinquency of El Salvador. The situation there is very delicate. A mother has instincts toward her children, and, well, I saw a very dangerous future for them,” Maria Ayala says.

The Salvadoran civil war—which killed some 70,000 from 1980 to 1992, including San Salvador Archbishop Oscar Romero—spawned gang violence by groups like Mara Salvatrucha.


Paper chase

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Immigration Social Justice
The right paperwork can save lives among the world’s stateless people.

After a record turnout of nearly 60 million Americans marched through voting booths this primary season, poll watchers are expecting U.S. citizens to vote in historic numbers next month, determining in classic democratic fashion (assuming the Supreme Court is not asked to intervene) who will lead the United States over the next four years.


Let my people stay

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Immigration
How to deal with the immigration “problem”? Give people a real choice on migration.

It may surprise red-white-and-blue Americans fixated on preventing the Hispanic reconquista of the Anglo Norte, but many of the folks they howl most about agree with them. They don’t want to come to America any more than these Americans want to let them in.


Let my people stay

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Immigration
How to deal with the immigration “problem”? Give people a real choice on migration.

It may surprise red-white-and-blue Americans fixated on preventing the Hispanic reconquista of the Anglo Norte, but many of the folks they howl most about agree with them. They don’t want to come to America any more than these Americans want to let them in.


Borderline Christianity

By Moises Sandoval| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Immigration

During Mass each Wednesday at Casa Juan Diego in Houston, immigrants speak of not eating for days, having nothing to drink for a week, seeing people die of thirst or because they drank irrigation water with chemicals in it.


Borderline Christianity

By Moises Sandoval| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Immigration

During Mass each Wednesday at Casa Juan Diego in Houston, immigrants speak of not eating for days, having nothing to drink for a week, seeing people die of thirst or because they drank irrigation water with chemicals in it.


Huddled masses: The history of our immigrant church

By Moises Sandoval| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Immigration

One night in 1967, Marcelino Ramos entered the United States illegally in the trunk of a car. Crammed with him as the smuggler's car crossed the border without incident from Tijuana, Mexico were his wife, María, his 7-year-old son, Humberto, and his 5-year-old daughter, Rosa. It is the heat that Humberto, now the assistant director of Hispanic ministry for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles, most remembers.

"I always tell people that I am a wetback, not from swimming the river but because I was wet with sweat."


Be our guest?

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Immigration
The U.S. should be a good host and protect the migrant workers who knock on our door.

 

In the colonial period the destitute and desperate escaping the poverty of European backwaters made their way to America as indentured servants, signing away the only commodity they had to offer: themselves. Frequently used up to the end of human endurance by their "employers," these earliest members of America's working class experienced a dehumanization that was only exceeded by the treatment of Africans brought over as slaves.


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