US Catholic Faith in Real Life

Who suffers most from climate change?

By Dom Erwin Kräutler | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
Fifty years after the game-changing Second Vatican Council a new generation helps the church respond to today’s signs of the times. Here, Dom Erwin Krautler stresses the importance of paying attention to climate change because of its human cost.

Read more scholars on today's signs of the times.

The church calls on all people and governments to protect the future of God’s creation by addressing the urgent threat of global warming.


Waist management: Can government regulation curb our bad eating habits?

By Kevin Clarke | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
Banning the Big Gulp isn’t enough to tip the scales in America’s obesity epidemic.

Gluttony is the only one of the not-so-magnificent seven that is literally a deadly sin; Americans have been proving that through congested arteries and heart disease for decades. Lifestyle-driven diabetes makes a cross of daily life for thousands and now even burdens U.S. children, many of whom contract the debilitating illness because of sedentary childhoods and poor eating habits.


Park it: Get out of your car

By Father Thomas Massaro, S.J. | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article

Editors’ note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


Though the mountains may fall: The cost of mountain top removal

By Kyle T. Kramer | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
In Appalachia, the coal industry thrives on stripping the landscape—and people’s livelihoods.


[Watch the slideshow that accompanies this article.]

Rick Handshoe lives on the battle line. Explosions shake his house regularly, covering it with dust and debris and cracking its foundation. A convoy of supply trucks rumbles constantly past his front porch. He lives amid danger and disturbance, with peace but a distant memory.


Slideshow: Though the mountains may fall

Online Editor | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article

This slideshow accompanies the article Though the mountains may fall, which appeared in the April 2012 issue of U.S. Catholic (Vol. 77, No. 4, pages 12-16).


Performance review: More feedback on President Obama

Online Editor | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article

We don't normally publish the feedback from our Reader Surveys online, out of respect for the privacy of respondents (name and city are included in this section), but between the record amount or responses to our survey on President Obama and the passion with which our readers responded, we wanted to share them with our online readers.

We've included some of our favorite answers without any identifying information.

For Catholics, the greatest success of the Obama administration has been:

The passage of healthcare reform.


Performance review: Readers rate President Obama

By Scott Alessi | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
U.S. Catholic readers provide a progress report on Barack Obama’s first term in office.

I'll be green for Christmas

By Megan Sweas | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
Let’s not only be green when summer’s here but also during the most wonderful time of the year.

The anticipation was over, the gifts all opened, and nothing left to do except take it all in. Even when I was little, it was one of my favorite moments of Christmas. I'd sit with my loot sorted next to me and survey the living room while peeling the customary orange from my stocking. Red, green, and patterned wrapping paper covered the floor, and the cats, high on new catnip, would be attacking a bow under the tree.


Think outside the box: Being green at the end of life

By Joe Sehee | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article

Editors' note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


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