I'll be green for Christmas

By Megan Sweas| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
Let’s not only be green when summer’s here but also during the most wonderful time of the year.

The anticipation was over, the gifts all opened, and nothing left to do except take it all in. Even when I was little, it was one of my favorite moments of Christmas. I'd sit with my loot sorted next to me and survey the living room while peeling the customary orange from my stocking. Red, green, and patterned wrapping paper covered the floor, and the cats, high on new catnip, would be attacking a bow under the tree.


Think outside the box: Being green at the end of life

By Joe Sehee| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment

Editors' note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


Think outside the box: Being green at the end of life

By Joe Sehee| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment

Editors' note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


Urban planting: Turning blight into bounty in the inner city

By Olga Bonfiglio| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Social Justice
Armed with soil and seeds, Catholics in blighted cities are taking social justice into their own hands.

In Camden, New Jersey a jumble of railroad tracks, freeways, and abandoned factories lace through the Waterfront South area on the Delaware River just across from Philadelphia. During heavy rains, a nearby wastewater treatment plant frequently leaks raw sewage onto the streets.


Urban planting: Turning blight into bounty in the inner city

By Olga Bonfiglio| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Social Justice
Armed with soil and seeds, Catholics in blighted cities are taking social justice into their own hands.

In Camden, New Jersey a jumble of railroad tracks, freeways, and abandoned factories lace through the Waterfront South area on the Delaware River just across from Philadelphia. During heavy rains, a nearby wastewater treatment plant frequently leaks raw sewage onto the streets.


Parish resources for growing a community garden

By Olga Bonfiglio| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Parish Life Social Justice
Practical, hands-on actions are the best way for individuals and faith communities to put their faith into action, says the Michigan Catholic Rural Life Coalition (MCLRC). Here’s how they say to get involved and get growing.
 

Parish Farmer’s Market:


Parish resources for growing a community garden

By Olga Bonfiglio| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Parish Life Social Justice
Practical, hands-on actions are the best way for individuals and faith communities to put their faith into action, says the Michigan Catholic Rural Life Coalition (MCLRC). Here’s how they say to get involved and get growing.
 

Parish Farmer’s Market:


Related links: Resources for urban agriculture

By Olga Bonfiglio| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Social Justice
Check out these links for more information on urban planting:

"For I Was Hungry and You Gave Me Food" (Mt 25:35)
Catholic Reflections on Food, Farmers, and Farmworkers
http://www.usccb.org/bishops/agricultural.shtml

Care of God’s Creation
http://www.usccb.org/campus/teaching-creation.shtml


Eating is believing: A U.S. Catholic interview with Chef Kevin Gillespie

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Spirituality
What you put on your plate says something about the kind of person you are, says this Catholic gourmet chef and reality TV star.

Kevin Gillespie comes from a long line of Southerners: “My parents, grandparents, great-grandparents, and great-great-grandparents are all from the South,” he says. They hail specifically from the Appalachian Mountains, where the traditional diet depended heavily on what was in season and grown locally, thanks to minimal opportunities for preservation.


O death, where is thy ecological concern?

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