US Catholic Faith in Real Life

Jessie Dye: Befriending creation through Earth Ministry

Through her work with Earth Ministry, Jessie Dye translates faith into climate action.

By Mallory McDuff | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Your Faith

Jessie Dye is rarely at a loss for words. And that’s a good thing, because she’s part of a grassroots climate movement that has no time for silence. When she testifies at public hearings, lobbies at the capitol, or preaches in sanctuaries, she often shares one phrase reflecting her very reason for being: “My name is Jessie Dye, and I am here on behalf of my faith.” 


War gone viral

Violent conflicts around the world are a breeding ground for dangerous diseases.

By Kevin Clarke | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Justice
While the world’s focus has properly shifted to the plight of Syrian refugees pressing against Europe’s southern borders, the brutal conflict in Yemen has attracted far less attention. The conflict there, trudging into its second year, has proved a match with the Syrian civil war in terms of disregard for noncombatant immunity and wanton destruction of ancient sites and civilian infrastructure.
 

Catholic groups rally against climate change amid intense church debate

By David Gibson | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Your Faith

c. 2015 Religion News Service

(RNS) Catholic environmental groups from around the world on Wednesday (January 14) announced a new global network to battle climate change just as many Catholic conservatives are sharply criticizing Pope Francis’ campaign to put environmental protection high on the church’s agenda.


Starving for attention: Bringing food production back to the masses

By Kevin Clarke | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Justice
Let’s stop big corporations from playing hunger games with our food production.

15 years ago in U.S. Catholic: How does our garden grow?

Online Editor | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Your Faith

By Bishop Robert Morneau

This article appeared in the June 1999 issue of U.S. Catholic (Vol. 64, No. 6, pages 34-37).


Seven tips for moral eating

By Sue Stanton | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Justice

According to Catholic Rural Life, what we eat is a moral issue. How do we use an informed conscience to make moral eating decisions?

1. By placing an emphasis on eating and purchasing foods that are good for the planet.

2. By eating and purchasing foods that are good to grow and that benefit soil and water resources.

3. By focusing our purchasing decisions on the common good—what is good and just for farms, farmers, and their workers in terms of health and well being.

4. By asking questions about how food is grown, harvested, and kept safe for us to eat.


Family farmers: Living on the edge

By Lauren Caggiano | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Lifestyle

The year 2009 was a particularly challenging one for independent farmers like Teri Rosendahl. With the global financial crisis in full swing, small family farms were hit hard, and Rosendahl and her husband, Peter, were forced to mortgage a lot of the equipment they used at Udder Valley Dairy in rural Spring Grove, Minnesota just to get by. But from small daily struggles to major financial obstacles, challenges had simply become a way of life on the small, family-owned dairy farm.


Food fight: The pros and cons of genetically modified food

By Sue Stanton | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Lifestyle
Genetic modification has yielded major changes in the way we grow our food, but concerns are cropping up over whether a bigger harvest means a better—or safer—diet.

How does our food system affect what we eat?

By A U.S. Catholic interview | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Culture

“We’ve gotten away from the real meaning of food, and the power of food,” Michael Pollan told us in a December 2013 interview. The famous food author has helped spur a movement encouraging people to return to using whole, real ingredients in home-cooked meals. He is known for touting a primary rule about food and eating: Eat food, not too much, mostly plants.


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