Our Lady of Waste Management: Parish-based environmentalism

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Parish Life
Parishes are finding that reducing their carbon footprint is not only an environmental issue but a spiritual one, too.

Parishioners at Mary Immaculate Church in East Los Angeles meet monthly in convivencias, or town hall meetings, to discuss parish initiatives. Last autumn, when they learned that 38 million water bottles annually are sent to U.S. landfills, their vote on what the parish should do wasn't even close. Plastic water bottles are now banned from the campus.


Why should parishes go green?

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Parish Life
Five reasons Catholic communities should care about cleaning up the environment.

1. You don't have to believe in climate change to believe in its solution. Energy conservation and alternative energy use mean healthier children, improved national security, and lower heating and cooling bills for families and parishes. It's a "no regrets" strategy.


Religious by nature: An interview with Keith Warner, OFM on the environment

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Faith and Science Spirituality
A Franciscan environmental activist recycles some ancient traditions for modern use. 

[Read more about St. Francis, patron of ecology.]

Hundreds of years before the environmental movement, St. Francis of Assisi recognized God in creation and changed his life. Today one of his spiritual sons, Keith Douglass Warner, O.F.M., is encouraging Catholics to do the same.


Religious by nature: An interview with Keith Warner, OFM on the environment

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Faith and Science Spirituality
A Franciscan environmental activist recycles some ancient traditions for modern use. 

[Read more about St. Francis, patron of ecology.]

Hundreds of years before the environmental movement, St. Francis of Assisi recognized God in creation and changed his life. Today one of his spiritual sons, Keith Douglass Warner, O.F.M., is encouraging Catholics to do the same.


Glad you asked: Is it a sin to drive an SUV?

By Kevin Considine| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment
Gas-guzzlers aren't generally chic in Catholic circles. These days many of us are wondering whether we can drive one with a clear conscience. But is it a sin?

Simply defined, to sin is to say "no" to God. It is a rejection of God's free gifts as well as the grace-filled relationship that God always offers. It is to choose what is not good while exercising one's mature free will. Often it is as simple as choosing what is easy or what is the societal norm without using the eyes of faith.


Go outside and play

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment
Falls and fresh air can teach kids the most important lessons of faith and life.

If you want peace, cultivate creation," Pope Benedict XVI said in his 2010 World Day of Peace reflection, arguably a message not just for the new year but for the new decade. With one sentence Benedict adroitly tied together a gang of the major preoccupations of Catholic social teaching with Pope Paul VI's radical 1972 admonishment: "If you want peace, work for justice."


Derek Eisel: Protecting the environment

By Michelle Bearden| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment

Growing up in northern Virginia, Derek Eisel had a front-row seat to a changing world.

He watched forests cut down and bucolic pasture land paved over into suburbs. He was told it was "progress," but he wasn't buying it.

The effect it had on a young Eisel changed the course of his life. He believes watching nature disappear is when the seeds of his environmental activism were planted.

"It bothered me then, and it bothers me now," says Eisel, 36, a Seattle software manager developer.


Derek Eisel: Protecting the environment

By Michelle Bearden| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment

Growing up in northern Virginia, Derek Eisel had a front-row seat to a changing world.

He watched forests cut down and bucolic pasture land paved over into suburbs. He was told it was "progress," but he wasn't buying it.

The effect it had on a young Eisel changed the course of his life. He believes watching nature disappear is when the seeds of his environmental activism were planted.

"It bothered me then, and it bothers me now," says Eisel, 36, a Seattle software manager developer.


This land is our land: National parks protect God's creation for all

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment
Would you like a demonstration of the Catholic belief that everyone has a right to the beauty of God's creation? Visit a national park.

This October millions of Americans took a stay-cation by watching Ken Burns' gorgeous new film The National Parks: America's Best Idea, enjoying a 12-hour pilgrimage through some of the most beautiful places in the United States, perhaps on the planet.


This land is our land: National parks protect God's creation for all

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment
Would you like a demonstration of the Catholic belief that everyone has a right to the beauty of God's creation? Visit a national park.

This October millions of Americans took a stay-cation by watching Ken Burns' gorgeous new film The National Parks: America's Best Idea, enjoying a 12-hour pilgrimage through some of the most beautiful places in the United States, perhaps on the planet.


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