Urban planting: Turning blight into bounty in the inner city

By Olga Bonfiglio| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Social Justice
Armed with soil and seeds, Catholics in blighted cities are taking social justice into their own hands.

In Camden, New Jersey a jumble of railroad tracks, freeways, and abandoned factories lace through the Waterfront South area on the Delaware River just across from Philadelphia. During heavy rains, a nearby wastewater treatment plant frequently leaks raw sewage onto the streets.


Parish resources for growing a community garden

By Olga Bonfiglio| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Parish Life Social Justice
Practical, hands-on actions are the best way for individuals and faith communities to put their faith into action, says the Michigan Catholic Rural Life Coalition (MCLRC). Here’s how they say to get involved and get growing.
 

Parish Farmer’s Market:


Related links: Resources for urban agriculture

By Olga Bonfiglio| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Social Justice
Check out these links for more information on urban planting:

"For I Was Hungry and You Gave Me Food" (Mt 25:35)
Catholic Reflections on Food, Farmers, and Farmworkers
http://www.usccb.org/bishops/agricultural.shtml

Care of God’s Creation
http://www.usccb.org/campus/teaching-creation.shtml


Urban planting: Turning blight into bounty in the inner city

By Olga Bonfiglio| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Social Justice
Armed with soil and seeds, Catholics in blighted cities are taking social justice into their own hands.

In Camden, New Jersey a jumble of railroad tracks, freeways, and abandoned factories lace through the Waterfront South area on the Delaware River just across from Philadelphia. During heavy rains, a nearby wastewater treatment plant frequently leaks raw sewage onto the streets.


Eating is believing: A U.S. Catholic interview with Chef Kevin Gillespie

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Spirituality
What you put on your plate says something about the kind of person you are, says this Catholic gourmet chef and reality TV star.

Kevin Gillespie comes from a long line of Southerners: “My parents, grandparents, great-grandparents, and great-great-grandparents are all from the South,” he says. They hail specifically from the Appalachian Mountains, where the traditional diet depended heavily on what was in season and grown locally, thanks to minimal opportunities for preservation.


O death, where is thy ecological concern?

Online Editor| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article

If not redirected in 5 seconds, please click here. REDIRECT SCRIPT


Leave no trace: "Uncontacted" people in South America

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Social Justice
The modern world threatens the existence of a small group of our own species.

Multinational mining interests, illegal logging, and slash-and-burn agriculture are among the many threats to the fragile ecosystems of South America’s rain forests. Efforts to protect them often cite the important role of rain forests as a preserve of plant and animal biodiversity or focus on their importance as the “lungs of the world.”


Star power: The future of solar energy

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment
The energy policy of the future should be sung to the tune of “Here Comes the Sun.”

Events out of Japan persist in an irradiated gloom. The disaster unfolding in Fukushima Daiichi represents a level of calamity for which adjectives have yet to be invented. It’s quite possible that in the end, in a replay of the Chernobyl disaster, areas around the plant may not be suitable again for human habitation.


Star power: The future of solar energy

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment
The energy policy of the future should be sung to the tune of “Here Comes the Sun.”

Events out of Japan persist in an irradiated gloom. The disaster unfolding in Fukushima Daiichi represents a level of calamity for which adjectives have yet to be invented. It’s quite possible that in the end, in a replay of the Chernobyl disaster, areas around the plant may not be suitable again for human habitation.


It's easy being green when building a church

By Judith Dupré| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Art and Architecture Environment
It's not as difficult—or expensive—as you might think to build a green parish.

Church design is evolving as people reawaken to the ancient wisdom that the environment is a series of exquisite interconnections. Forward-looking congregations are building and renovating in ways that reflect the belief that God resides in the world and all creation resides within God.


Pages