Home sweet biohazard

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Marriage and Family
There's no place like home, as long as parents prevent it from becoming toxic.

Thoroughly modern parents of the late 20th century might have cracked open a tin of baby formula, poured it into a plastic bottle, and warmed it in a Teflon-coated pan before rushing it to baby's toy-littered nursery. Today's with-it 'rents think twice before exposing their child to-pay attention here, this gets complicated-this following impromptu periodic table of hazardous materials:


Food for thought: Resources for Greener Pastures

By Megan Sweas| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment
Food is a basic part of everyone's lives and yet the issues surrounding it are extremely complex. The following resources provide more information on our personal diets, national politics, global economics, and how they all relate:

Political Food Fight

Months after the deadline for the 2002 Farm Bill passed, the House of Representatives and the Senate are still trying to create a compromise between their two versions of the bill and the Bush administration is still threatening to veto the whole thing.


Food for thought: Resources for Greener Pastures

By Megan Sweas| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment
Food is a basic part of everyone's lives and yet the issues surrounding it are extremely complex. The following resources provide more information on our personal diets, national politics, global economics, and how they all relate:

Political Food Fight

Months after the deadline for the 2002 Farm Bill passed, the House of Representatives and the Senate are still trying to create a compromise between their two versions of the bill and the Bush administration is still threatening to veto the whole thing.


I think I can, I think I can

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment
  
A 19th-century mode of transport may be the answer to our current environmental woes.

The Bible tells me so

By Diane Bergant, C.S.A.| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Scripture and Theology
  
The Good Book is full of passages to inspire environmental action.

Greener pastures

By Megan Sweas| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment
How family farmers are planting for a sustainable future

Russ Kremer had a near-death experience in 1989. On his central Missouri farm, he was bitten by a hog and contracted a form of strep resistant to at least five antibiotics. His hogs' feed included antibiotics to protect them—but not humans—from disease.

Doctors cured him, but Kremer decided to start his farm operation anew, raising hogs naturally. "I quit cold turkey," he says. "I've basically been a crusader or an evangelist for raising hogs this way. I did it because it was the right thing to do."


Greener pastures

By Megan Sweas| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment
How family farmers are planting for a sustainable future

Russ Kremer had a near-death experience in 1989. On his central Missouri farm, he was bitten by a hog and contracted a form of strep resistant to at least five antibiotics. His hogs' feed included antibiotics to protect them—but not humans—from disease.

Doctors cured him, but Kremer decided to start his farm operation anew, raising hogs naturally. "I quit cold turkey," he says. "I've basically been a crusader or an evangelist for raising hogs this way. I did it because it was the right thing to do."


The sky is falling. No, really.

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Ethic of Life
Even if Kristin Shrader-Frechette's mother hadn't died of an environmentally-induced cancer at the age of 43, leaving seven children motherless in Kentucky, chances are the Notre Dame professor would still have grown up to be a dynamo researcher and scholar working for environmental justice.

Not only does she know her science-with degrees in mathematics and philosophy as well as post-doctoral work in biology, hydroecology, and economics-she is also well versed in Catholic social teaching.


The sky is falling. No, really.

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Ethic of Life
Even if Kristin Shrader-Frechette's mother hadn't died of an environmentally-induced cancer at the age of 43, leaving seven children motherless in Kentucky, chances are the Notre Dame professor would still have grown up to be a dynamo researcher and scholar working for environmental justice.

Not only does she know her science-with degrees in mathematics and philosophy as well as post-doctoral work in biology, hydroecology, and economics-she is also well versed in Catholic social teaching.


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