Is anyone listening to the prophets anymore?

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology War and Peace
"They're speaking to every segment of any culture. They're giving hope to those that are under the heel. They're making those, like ourselves-who are somewhat in possession-- uneasy. And then, to authority, they're absolutely ruthless about the kind of power that crushes people and wages wars."

No forgiveness, no future

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace

In late 1995 Archbishop Desmond Tutu was looking forward to his retirement when South Africa's President Nelson Mandela appointed him chairperson of the country's Truth and Reconciliation Commission. "Who could ever say Mr. Mandela nay?" Tutu recalls. "My much-- longed-for sabbatical went out the window, and for nearly three years we would be involved in the devastating but also exhilarating work of the commission."


Even unto death: The martyrdom of Jean Donovan

By John Dear| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
Jean Donovan was a modern-day martyr, losing her life while caring for the poor in the midst of El Salvador's bloody civil war. Thirty years later, her memory continues to inspire.

When I heard the news that four U.S. church women, including Jean Donovan, were raped and killed in El Salvador on Dec. 2, 1980, I was a senior at Duke University with plans to enter the Jesuits. But I was having second thoughts. What difference could I make? How can one witness to Christ in such a harsh world? Why bother?


Silent flight: Christians leave the Holy Land

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
The land of Jesus’ birth may soon be without Christians to celebrate it.

At eventide the square of the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem lights up like a Christmas scene. Brightly colored lights trail around the bell tower bathing Manger Square in a warm amber glow. Tourists lean on stones that have held up weary pilgrims for centuries. The low-tech light show washing over the square is unassuming and peaceful, just right for the spot tradition says the Prince of Peace entered human history in a most humble and vulnerable form.


Is torture losing its shock value?

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
Our government's use of torture puts being both American and Catholic in serious conflict, says this theologian.

Theological research doesn't often include reading detailed accounts of torture, but it did for William Cavanaugh, now a professor of theology at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota. There's also sleep deprivation, exposing people to freezing temperatures for long periods, bombarding them with rock music for hours, head slapping, sexual humiliation, and sensory deprivation such as blindfolding, among others.


Is torture losing its shock value?

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
Our government's use of torture puts being both American and Catholic in serious conflict, says this theologian.

Theological research doesn't often include reading detailed accounts of torture, but it did for William Cavanaugh, now a professor of theology at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota. There's also sleep deprivation, exposing people to freezing temperatures for long periods, bombarding them with rock music for hours, head slapping, sexual humiliation, and sensory deprivation such as blindfolding, among others.


How Sant'Egidio received its "papal blessing"

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice

By Andrea Riccardi as told to Desmond O'Grady in a U.S. Catholic interview conducted by O'Grady.

It had been the custom in Rome that the diocesan pastoral visits were made by the pope's vicar rather than the pope himself. Pope Paul VI visited some parishes but did not reach us. John Paul II, younger and fitter, decided to visit all parishes himself.


Bombs away

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
President Obama wants to lock up nukes—but he isn’t about to throw away the key.

The 2008 election of Barack Obama was arguably a culmination of the hope-filled idealism that helped propel the 1960s civil rights movement. Although it’s fashionable these days, in the last gasps of the frat-boy revivalism that began the century to ridicule such idealism, the truth is we wouldn’t have made it to the Obama era’s here-and-now without that there-and-then.


Bombs away

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
President Obama wants to lock up nukes—but he isn’t about to throw away the key.

The 2008 election of Barack Obama was arguably a culmination of the hope-filled idealism that helped propel the 1960s civil rights movement. Although it’s fashionable these days, in the last gasps of the frat-boy revivalism that began the century to ridicule such idealism, the truth is we wouldn’t have made it to the Obama era’s here-and-now without that there-and-then.


An early call to get out

By Meinrad Scherer-Emunds| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
In 1967 U.S. Catholic editors call for a swift end to the Vietnam War.

"It is our contention that the war in Vietnam is wrong, is unjust, is immoral," the editors of U.S. Catholic wrote in their December 1967 editorial-one of the few instances in its history in which the magazine took an official editorial position.


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