Choking on ashes

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
In this column from November 2001, Kevin Clarke asks if justice, rather than retribution, can be served in response to America's worst terrorist attack.

I grew up in a family thick with cops and firemen in a New York suburb peopled by cops and firemen, so it was with a special dread that I watched a churning cloud of dust and debris and choking ash envelope people running for their lives in lower Manhattan on September 11, knowing that a fear that had haunted my childhood would be coming home that night as a terrible reality to hundreds of New York families.


Choking on ashes

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
In this column from November 2001, Kevin Clarke asks if justice, rather than retribution, can be served in response to America's worst terrorist attack.

I grew up in a family thick with cops and firemen in a New York suburb peopled by cops and firemen, so it was with a special dread that I watched a churning cloud of dust and debris and choking ash envelope people running for their lives in lower Manhattan on September 11, knowing that a fear that had haunted my childhood would be coming home that night as a terrible reality to hundreds of New York families.


What do you do with such pain?

By Tom McGrath| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Spirituality War and Peace
This column from the November 2001 issue in response to 9/11 comments that in the face of suffering we ought to seek a wisdom that can lead us out of the valley of death.

"If we don't transform our pain, we will always transmit it," says Franciscan priest Richard Rohr. After the events of Sept. 11, 2001, such transformation has become all the more daunting, yet all the more necessary if we are to survive as a species--not to mention be faithful to our God.


What do you do with such pain?

By Tom McGrath| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Spirituality War and Peace
This column from the November 2001 issue in response to 9/11 comments that in the face of suffering we ought to seek a wisdom that can lead us out of the valley of death.

"If we don't transform our pain, we will always transmit it," says Franciscan priest Richard Rohr. After the events of Sept. 11, 2001, such transformation has become all the more daunting, yet all the more necessary if we are to survive as a species--not to mention be faithful to our God.


Let's drop the bomb: It's time to get rid of nukes

By Bishop Leroy Matthiesen| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
The U.S. bishops issued their 1983 pastoral letter The Challenge of Peace without a total condemnation of nuclear arms but planned to revisit the issue after the Cold War. More than 25 years later, the question is still on the table.

Sounding Boards are one person's take on a many-sided subject and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


Let's drop the bomb: It's time to get rid of nukes

By Bishop Leroy Matthiesen| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
The U.S. bishops issued their 1983 pastoral letter The Challenge of Peace without a total condemnation of nuclear arms but planned to revisit the issue after the Cold War. More than 25 years later, the question is still on the table.

Sounding Boards are one person's take on a many-sided subject and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


Preferential option for the Pentagon?

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice War and Peace
As the debt-ceiling debate stumbles toward resolution, this May 2005 column about the 2006 federal budget shows how little things have changed when it comes to our priorities.

The 2006 federal budget is slightly less than six gazillion pages of eye-straining statistics, outlandish bureaucratic acronyms, and unspeakable Orwellian babble, bound in no-nonsense government blue and suitable for months of obsessive home study or as a sturdy bludgeon against domestic intruders.


Preferential option for the Pentagon?

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice War and Peace
As the debt-ceiling debate stumbles toward resolution, this May 2005 column about the 2006 federal budget shows how little things have changed when it comes to our priorities.

The 2006 federal budget is slightly less than six gazillion pages of eye-straining statistics, outlandish bureaucratic acronyms, and unspeakable Orwellian babble, bound in no-nonsense government blue and suitable for months of obsessive home study or as a sturdy bludgeon against domestic intruders.


Where were you on 9/11? Take our survey

Megan Sweas| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article

REDIRECT SCRIPT


Pages