The wars they are a-changin’

By Ruth Graham| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace Young Adults
The attitudes of young Catholics toward the military conflicts of the last 10 years spring from a complex web of influences that include demographics, church leadership, and media coverage.

But a major piece of the story is the drastic shift from citizens going to war in a country with a mandatory draft to the all-volunteer army we have today.


Conflicted generation: Millennials and the war on terror

By Ruth Graham| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace Young Adults
For Catholic millennials the past decade of war has mostly remained out of sight and out of mind.

Guilt by disassociation: The moral toll of war on those who fight it

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
The human cost of the war on terror burdens those who fight it.

Americans have grown accustomed to the long list of injuries suffered by the veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan: brain trauma, shrapnel wounds, lost limbs. Along with these has come a host of psychological and emotional damage: post-traumatic stress disorder, substance dependency and abuse, and depression, all leading to a ballooning rate of suicide among members of the armed forces.


Guilt by disassociation: The moral toll of war on those who fight it

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
The human cost of the war on terror burdens those who fight it.

Americans have grown accustomed to the long list of injuries suffered by the veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan: brain trauma, shrapnel wounds, lost limbs. Along with these has come a host of psychological and emotional damage: post-traumatic stress disorder, substance dependency and abuse, and depression, all leading to a ballooning rate of suicide among members of the armed forces.


Guilt by disassociation: The moral toll of war on those who fight it

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Spirituality War and Peace
The human cost of the war on terror burdens those who fight it.

Americans have grown accustomed to the long list of injuries suffered by the veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan: brain trauma, shrapnel wounds, lost limbs. Along with these has come a host of psychological and emotional damage: post-traumatic stress disorder, substance dependency and abuse, and depression, all leading to a ballooning rate of suicide among members of the armed forces.


Guilt by disassociation: The moral toll of war on those who fight it

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Spirituality War and Peace
The human cost of the war on terror burdens those who fight it.

Americans have grown accustomed to the long list of injuries suffered by the veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan: brain trauma, shrapnel wounds, lost limbs. Along with these has come a host of psychological and emotional damage: post-traumatic stress disorder, substance dependency and abuse, and depression, all leading to a ballooning rate of suicide among members of the armed forces.


Poor spending choices: Catholic values and the U.S. budget

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
Getting our nation’s budget priorities in order will require a show of solidarity.

In the service: Priests in the military

By John Lasker| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
The U.S. armed forces are looking for a few good men-priests-to serve Catholics in uniform. But some question whether Father should rank among military officers.

For much of the previous year, Father Joe Porpiglia had a grueling routine-and he wasn't even running his parish in Buffalo. He was in Afghanistan as a U.S. chaplain, racing across a rugged and war-torn landscape in massive helicopters and transport planes. He served Mass and the sacraments to thousands of soldiers, but also offered counsel and comfort to anyone who sought him out.


In the service: Priests in the military

By John Lasker| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
The U.S. armed forces are looking for a few good men-priests-to serve Catholics in uniform. But some question whether Father should rank among military officers.

For much of the previous year, Father Joe Porpiglia had a grueling routine-and he wasn't even running his parish in Buffalo. He was in Afghanistan as a U.S. chaplain, racing across a rugged and war-torn landscape in massive helicopters and transport planes. He served Mass and the sacraments to thousands of soldiers, but also offered counsel and comfort to anyone who sought him out.


Cuban comeback: Change is on the horizon in Cuba

By Araceli M. Cantero| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Hispanic Catholics Politics War and Peace
Overcoming great obstacles, many Cubans are returning to the Catholic faith and helping renew the island’s church.

To this day Aldo Santos remembers with gratitude the frequent blackouts he experienced as a child in his native town of Holguín in northeast Cuba. Everyone in the neighborhood would come out of their house to gaze at the stars.

He would look up and ask his father about the moon and the planets and about a future full of dreams. He learned that even galaxies die, and it was then that he began to understand something about the end of things.


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