US Catholic Faith in Real Life

Tweet like an Egyptian

By Kevin Clarke | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
The Internet keeps its promise in Egypt.

Even unto death: The martyrdom of Jean Donovan

By John Dear | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Jean Donovan was a modern-day martyr, losing her life while caring for the poor in the midst of El Salvador's bloody civil war. Thirty years later, her memory continues to inspire.

When I heard the news that four U.S. church women, including Jean Donovan, were raped and killed in El Salvador on Dec. 2, 1980, I was a senior at Duke University with plans to enter the Jesuits. But I was having second thoughts. What difference could I make? How can one witness to Christ in such a harsh world? Why bother?


Silent flight: Christians leave the Holy Land

By Kevin Clarke | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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The land of Jesus’ birth may soon be without Christians to celebrate it.

At eventide the square of the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem lights up like a Christmas scene. Brightly colored lights trail around the bell tower bathing Manger Square in a warm amber glow. Tourists lean on stones that have held up weary pilgrims for centuries. The low-tech light show washing over the square is unassuming and peaceful, just right for the spot tradition says the Prince of Peace entered human history in a most humble and vulnerable form.


Is torture losing its shock value?

By A U.S. Catholic interview | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Our government's use of torture puts being both American and Catholic in serious conflict, says this theologian.

Theological research doesn't often include reading detailed accounts of torture, but it did for William Cavanaugh, now a professor of theology at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota. There's also sleep deprivation, exposing people to freezing temperatures for long periods, bombarding them with rock music for hours, head slapping, sexual humiliation, and sensory deprivation such as blindfolding, among others.


Bombs away

By Kevin Clarke | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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President Obama wants to lock up nukes—but he isn’t about to throw away the key.

The 2008 election of Barack Obama was arguably a culmination of the hope-filled idealism that helped propel the 1960s civil rights movement. Although it’s fashionable these days, in the last gasps of the frat-boy revivalism that began the century to ridicule such idealism, the truth is we wouldn’t have made it to the Obama era’s here-and-now without that there-and-then.


Not-so-basic training: Recruiting priests for military duty

By John Lasker | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Like any enlisted man or woman, Catholic chaplains have go training, and they don't get special treatment.

American idol: An interview with Andrew Bacevich

By A U.S. Catholic interview | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
Could ending our adoration of oil be the key to a peaceful future?

Has the idea of American exceptionalism finally run its historical course in the big muddy by the Euphrates? A persistent critic of the Iraq invasion and an ongoing skeptic of U.S. military adventures pretty much anywhere, Andrew Bacevich is too much a scholar of history to believe that Americans have permanently lost their taste for foreign entanglements.


¡Romero vive!

By Kevin Clarke | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
“The harvest comes because of the grain that dies.”

Let's canonize Dorothy Day

Dorothy Day, canonization, saint, Salt magazine, Claretians, Henry Fehren

By Father Henry Fehren | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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With this 1983 article Claretian Publications began a grassroots effort to promote the official declaration of Dorothy Day as a saint.

The Congo’s killing fields

By Kevin Clarke | Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
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Families separated. Millions left for dead. Do we share some of the blame?

 

Patrick Mwnyamahord knows where his father is buried because a neighbor showed him that small place. What he doesn't know is how his father got there, and there was no one he could safely ask, not then. Twelve years ago he and his family made one of a series of sudden escapes from the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) into nearby Burundi. On this particular exodus his father was too ill to travel and the family had to leave him.


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