The torture show

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews War and Peace
  
Jack Bauer and 24 have made torture mainstream in American homes and psyches.

Mea maxima culpa

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
  
Among the many victims of the Iraq war have been our own fellow Catholics.


Mea maxima culpa

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
  
Among the many victims of the Iraq war have been our own fellow Catholics.


Is this just war? Two Catholic perspectives on the war in Afghanistan

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace

Just as government officials have been struggling to find the right course of action in response to the terrorist attacks of September 11, Catholics-both here and around the world-have been struggling to determine what's right and what's wrong in that response. Looking for help and guidance in sorting out the moral and faith implications of the war our nation has engaged in, U.S. Catholic turned to Boston College social ethicist Lisa Sowle Cahill and to University of Notre Dame theologian Father Michael Baxter, C.S.C.


Is this just war? Two Catholic perspectives on the war in Afghanistan

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace

Just as government officials have been struggling to find the right course of action in response to the terrorist attacks of September 11, Catholics-both here and around the world-have been struggling to determine what's right and what's wrong in that response. Looking for help and guidance in sorting out the moral and faith implications of the war our nation has engaged in, U.S. Catholic turned to Boston College social ethicist Lisa Sowle Cahill and to University of Notre Dame theologian Father Michael Baxter, C.S.C.


Disturbing for peace

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
For most people, moving from New York City to a three-block town in the New Mexican desert might seem like a step toward relaxation. But John Dear, a Jesuit priest, peace activist, author, and lecturer, is not most people.

As soon as Dear arrived he started challenging the locals with his message of nonviolence. He developed such a reputation that before the nearby National Guard unit left for Iraq they decided to drop by Dear's home.


Disturbing for peace

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
For most people, moving from New York City to a three-block town in the New Mexican desert might seem like a step toward relaxation. But John Dear, a Jesuit priest, peace activist, author, and lecturer, is not most people.

As soon as Dear arrived he started challenging the locals with his message of nonviolence. He developed such a reputation that before the nearby National Guard unit left for Iraq they decided to drop by Dear's home.


Promise of the Promised land

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology
A few months after Israeli soldiers deported the men of his village, 9-year-old Elias Chacour climbed the hills of Galilee to talk to his friend and champion, Jesus.

He imagined Jesus at the Mount of Beatitudes and contemplated what Jesus' words meant. "Do you want us to be your lips and hands and feet-as Mother prays-to bring peace again? If that's true, you can use my hands and feet. Even my tongue," Chacour remembers in his book Blood Brothers (Chosen Books).


Is torture losing its shock value?

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
Our government's use of torture puts being both American and Catholic in serious conflict, says this theologian.

 

Theological research doesn't often include reading detailed accounts of torture, but it did for William Cavanaugh, now a professor of theology at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota. "I read account after account of people's torture, and that's what I did all day," he says of his early work at the University of Notre Dame Center for Civil and

Human Rights. "It was a grim time."


Is torture losing its shock value?

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
Our government's use of torture puts being both American and Catholic in serious conflict, says this theologian.

 

Theological research doesn't often include reading detailed accounts of torture, but it did for William Cavanaugh, now a professor of theology at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota. "I read account after account of people's torture, and that's what I did all day," he says of his early work at the University of Notre Dame Center for Civil and

Human Rights. "It was a grim time."


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