The Congo’s killing fields

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics War and Peace
Families separated. Millions left for dead. Do we share some of the blame?

 

Patrick Mwnyamahord knows where his father is buried because a neighbor showed him that small place. What he doesn't know is how his father got there, and there was no one he could safely ask, not then. Twelve years ago he and his family made one of a series of sudden escapes from the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) into nearby Burundi. On this particular exodus his father was too ill to travel and the family had to leave him.


Frosted mini-nukes!

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
New classes of "usable" nuclear weapons are on the Pentagon's menu. Who's buying?

 

Bunker Buster the Friendly Nuke was launched by the Friends Committee on National Legislation recently. "He's cute; he's small; and he won't blow up the world" is FCNL's satirical introduction to this adorably animated little nuke, but the Quakers' ironic rhetoric is not far off from the actual verbiage the Pentagon and White House have deployed to improve the palatability of their longed-for retooling of America's nuclear weapons.


Frosted mini-nukes!

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
New classes of "usable" nuclear weapons are on the Pentagon's menu. Who's buying?

 

Bunker Buster the Friendly Nuke was launched by the Friends Committee on National Legislation recently. "He's cute; he's small; and he won't blow up the world" is FCNL's satirical introduction to this adorably animated little nuke, but the Quakers' ironic rhetoric is not far off from the actual verbiage the Pentagon and White House have deployed to improve the palatability of their longed-for retooling of America's nuclear weapons.


Can Nicaragua emerge from the storms of its past?

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace

The road from Chinandega to the Honduran Border comes to an abrupt end in a hill rise over the largest of the flood demolished bridges that line the eastwest highway out of Managua. When you reach the Hato Grande River, a small power launch carries travelers and relief supplies in an uncertain diagonal across the river's flow to the other side and into Honduras.


Can Nicaragua emerge from the storms of its past?

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace

The road from Chinandega to the Honduran Border comes to an abrupt end in a hill rise over the largest of the flood demolished bridges that line the eastwest highway out of Managua. When you reach the Hato Grande River, a small power launch carries travelers and relief supplies in an uncertain diagonal across the river's flow to the other side and into Honduras.


In the world but not of it

By Robert J. McClory| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace

You are critical of the prevailing view among Catholics of their own history and role in the United States. What is the story line of the tradition you call the "Americanist" or "Catholics to the rescue" tradition?


In the world but not of it

By Robert J. McClory| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace

You are critical of the prevailing view among Catholics of their own history and role in the United States. What is the story line of the tradition you call the "Americanist" or "Catholics to the rescue" tradition?


The trouble with Saint Dorothy

By Jim Forest| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article

Can you think of a word that describes a person who devoted much of her life to being with people many of us cross the street to avoid? Who for half a century did her best to make sure they didn't go hungry or freeze on winter nights? Who went to Mass every day until her legs couldn't take her that far, at which point Communion was brought to her? Who prayed every day for friend and enemy alike, and whose prayers, some are convinced, had miraculous results? Who went to Confession every week? Who was devoted to the rosary? Who wore hand-me-downs and lived in cold-waterflats?


How Christians went to war

By R. Scott Appleby| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace

Among the remarkable side effects of the conflict between the United States and Iraq has been the revival of the just war theory, the set of ethical reflections specifying the conditions under which a "just war" may be declared (jus ad bellum) and how it must be waged (jus in bello). Catholic moral theologians, accustomed to talking shop primarily to their students and to one another, enjoyed a short but intense heyday in the media spotlight during Operation Desert Storm and again, briefly, during the recent U.S. bombing of Iraq.


How Christians went to war

By R. Scott Appleby| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace

Among the remarkable side effects of the conflict between the United States and Iraq has been the revival of the just war theory, the set of ethical reflections specifying the conditions under which a "just war" may be declared (jus ad bellum) and how it must be waged (jus in bello). Catholic moral theologians, accustomed to talking shop primarily to their students and to one another, enjoyed a short but intense heyday in the media spotlight during Operation Desert Storm and again, briefly, during the recent U.S. bombing of Iraq.


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