Will work for peace in everyday life

By Heather Grennan Gary| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice War and Peace Young Adults

For Heidi Tousignant, the faith-formation director from Minnesota, having studied peace in college relates directly to some of her most important-and unpaid-work. As a parent "it absolutely enhances my vision of how to raise kids," she says. It's influenced her family's conversations, their values, their faith life, the decisions they make as a family, and what action they take in their community.


Resources for peacemaking

By Heather Grennan Gary| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice War and Peace Young Adults

Want to learn more about peace studies? Here are some resources recommended by people interviewed in Will work for Peace.

Publications:
Bitter Fruit: The Story of the American Coup in Guatemala, Revised and Expanded by Stephen Schlesinger, Stephen Kinzer, John H. Coatsworth, and Richard A. Nuccio (David Rockefeller Center Series on Latin American Studies)


Blessed are the peacemakers

By Heather Grennan Gary| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace

The first Catholic college to launch a peace studies program was Manhattan College in New York, which opened its Pacem in Terris Institute in 1965, offered its first interdisciplinary peace studies class a year later, and had an undergraduate major under way by 1971. Early in the program's development, Pope Paul VI took notice and sent his blessing, along with a message to the Institute's organizers encouraging the "efforts for education for peace" that were taking place.


Myla Leguro (Pictured below: Christopher Yanov and Shamsia Ramadhan)

A higher degree of peace: Graduate peace studies programs

By Heather Grennan Gary| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
Already graduated college? You can still return to school for a master's or Ph.D. in peace.

A few fit men: Healthy youth for healthy forces

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice War and Peace
We should be helping America’s young people really be all that they can be.

Despite the grim toll taken in what is becoming a war of attrition in Afghanistan, the Great Recession has helped U.S. armed services achieve record recruiting numbers in 2009. And after years of lowering minimum standards, the 2009 recruits are among the best educated and highest skilled in history. But Army and Marine recruitment drives are generating another and less welcome profile of America's youth: Call them Generation Unfit to Serve.


No forgiveness, no future: An interview with Archbishop Desmund Tutu

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology War and Peace
In an interview from our archives (August 2000), Archbishop Desmond Tutu shares the lessons learned from chairing South Africa's Turth and Reconciliation Commission.

Not-so-basic training: Recruiting priests for military duty

By John Lasker| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
Like any enlisted man or woman, Catholic chaplains have go training, and they don't get special treatment.

Not-so-basic training: Recruiting priests for military duty

By John Lasker| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
Like any enlisted man or woman, Catholic chaplains have go training, and they don't get special treatment.

Signs of peace

By Gerard F. Powers| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
Catholics around the world can inspire us with the many ways — both personal and political — through which they build peace.

Mary Mukanaho is a Tutsi in Rwanda. Her seven children and husband were killed in the 1994 genocide-by neighbors whom she had lived next to for 40 years. She survived because she happened to be out of the country at the time. She felt she was going mad and turned to alcohol to dull the pain. She was enraged to see her neighbors receive Communion with the very hands that had murdered her family.


Let's really go in peace

By John Dear| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
We need to break our personal and national addiction to violence if we hope to ever see an end to war.

To our modern ears the idea of heresy seems quaint and medieval-involving technical arguments about abstract matters. But I contend that heresy and its cousin apostasy are constructs of down-to-earth significance that we should keep in mind today. And for us Catholics, I submit, our chief heresy is violence.


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