Resources for Peacemaking

By Heather Grennan Gary| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice War and Peace Young Adults

Want to learn more about peace studies? Here are some resources recommended by people interviewed in Will work for Peace.

Publications:
Bitter Fruit: The Story of the American Coup in Guatemala, Revised and Expanded by Stephen Schlesinger, Stephen Kinzer, John H. Coatsworth, and Richard A. Nuccio (David Rockefeller Center Series on Latin American Studies)


A few fit men: Healthy youth for healthy forces

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice War and Peace
We should be helping America’s young people really be all that they can be.

Despite the grim toll taken in what is becoming a war of attrition in Afghanistan, the Great Recession has helped U.S. armed services achieve record recruiting numbers in 2009. And after years of lowering minimum standards, the 2009 recruits are among the best educated and highest skilled in history. But Army and Marine recruitment drives are generating another and less welcome profile of America's youth: Call them Generation Unfit to Serve.


No forgiveness, no future: An interview with Archbishop Desmund Tutu

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology War and Peace
In an interview from our archives (August 2000), Archbishop Desmond Tutu shares the lessons learned from chairing South Africa's Turth and Reconciliation Commission.

Not-so-basic training: Recruiting priests for military duty

By John Lasker| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
Like any enlisted man or woman, Catholic chaplains have go training, and they don't get special treatment.

Not-so-basic training: Recruiting priests for military duty

By John Lasker| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
Like any enlisted man or woman, Catholic chaplains have go training, and they don't get special treatment.

Signs of peace

By Gerard F. Powers| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
Catholics around the world can inspire us with the many ways — both personal and political — through which they build peace.

Mary Mukanaho is a Tutsi in Rwanda. Her seven children and husband were killed in the 1994 genocide-by neighbors whom she had lived next to for 40 years. She survived because she happened to be out of the country at the time. She felt she was going mad and turned to alcohol to dull the pain. She was enraged to see her neighbors receive Communion with the very hands that had murdered her family.


Let's really go in peace

By John Dear| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
We need to break our personal and national addiction to violence if we hope to ever see an end to war.

To our modern ears the idea of heresy seems quaint and medieval-involving technical arguments about abstract matters. But I contend that heresy and its cousin apostasy are constructs of down-to-earth significance that we should keep in mind today. And for us Catholics, I submit, our chief heresy is violence.


Peace trained

By Heather Grennan Gary| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
In Catholic classrooms and Ugandan villages, Patrick Corrigan strives to learn how to heal wounds of violence.

In 2007, six months after his college graduation, Patrick Corrigan found himself about as far from a leafy, peaceful campus as he could get-in Kampala, Uganda, sitting in on a meeting between parliamentarians and representatives of the Lord's Resistance Army, a notorious rebel group that has terrorized the region for decades and is best known for abducting children and forcing them to participate in its bloody campaigns.


American idol: An interview with Andrew Bacevich

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
Could ending our adoration of oil be the key to a peaceful future?

Has the idea of American exceptionalism finally run its historical course in the big muddy by the Euphrates? A persistent critic of the Iraq invasion and an ongoing skeptic of U.S. military adventures pretty much anywhere, Andrew Bacevich is too much a scholar of history to believe that Americans have permanently lost their taste for foreign entanglements.


American idol: An interview with Andrew Bacevich

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
Could ending our adoration of oil be the key to a peaceful future?

Has the idea of American exceptionalism finally run its historical course in the big muddy by the Euphrates? A persistent critic of the Iraq invasion and an ongoing skeptic of U.S. military adventures pretty much anywhere, Andrew Bacevich is too much a scholar of history to believe that Americans have permanently lost their taste for foreign entanglements.


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