Drone wars: Shedding light on our country's secret program

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics War and Peace
Rules of engagement for targeted killings have been shrouded in secrecy. According to this legal expert, we still need more transparency.

Is the war on drugs a just war?

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice War and Peace
The war on drugs isn’t working. In fact, it is making the problem even worse.

In May President Barack Obama signaled the beginning of the end of the war on terror, at least in a predominantly militarized form, during an address that attempted to balance encroachments on civil and human rights created by the nation’s anti-terror crusade against the legitimate, reasonable needs of security and tranquility. Is it time for the president to stand before the nation and make a similar speech about another war it has been waging, the horizonless war on drugs?


25 years ago in U.S. Catholic—Bombs away: What U.S. Catholic readers think about nuclear weapons

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Article Politics War and Peace

By Tim Unsworth

This article appeared in the August 1988 issue of U.S. Catholic (Vol. 53, No. 8, pages 6-17).

Although few readers believe God would intervene to stop a nuclear war, they still bend God's ear about it every day.

An old Arab proverb says: "Trust in God but tie up your camel." U.S. Catholic readers have a lot in common with the unknown camel driver who mined this bit of bucolic wisdom from the hardscrabble of his experience.


Muslim youth and extremism: A reflection after Boston

By A. Rashied Omar| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ecumenical & Interfaith Dialogue
In the wake of terrorism, the global community must come together to build welcoming, loving environments for our young people--especially Muslim youth.

The two suspects of the abominable bomb attacks of the Boston Marathon, Tamerlan Tsarnaev (26) and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (19), were permanent residents of the United States originally from Chechnya and were seemingly practicing Muslims.


Saying a prayer for God's nonviolent love

By Michael McCarthy| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace
Guest editorial

Advising Pope Francis on the challenges ahead

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Article Ecumenical & Interfaith Dialogue Environment Ethic of Life Faith and Science Immigration Marriage and Family Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments Social Justice Spirituality Vatican War and Peace Women

Be a shepherd of peace

By Marie Dennis| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Vatican War and Peace
With the church at a crossroads, Catholics look to Pope Francis for guidance. Marie Dennis calls the new pope to be a leader for peace in our world.

Be a shepherd of peace

By Marie Dennis| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Vatican War and Peace
With the church at a crossroads, Catholics look to Pope Francis for guidance. Marie Dennis calls the new pope to be a leader for peace in our world.

A farewell to arms: Is it time to get rid of our guns?

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace

Our best shot at protecting the common good isn’t to keep loading up on guns.

A few weeks before Adam Lanza began his shooting rampage among children in Newtown, Connecticut last December, Catholic priests in Chicago were leading weary processions against gun violence on the city’s gang-terrorized South Side. If the Newtown murders were a shock to the system, the regular gun violence that claims hundreds of lives each year in Chicago and other cities across the country has become so “normal” that the mayhem only occasionally warrants the raising of an editorial eyebrow.


A farewell to arms: Is it time to get rid of our guns?

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article War and Peace

Our best shot at protecting the common good isn’t to keep loading up on guns.

A few weeks before Adam Lanza began his shooting rampage among children in Newtown, Connecticut last December, Catholic priests in Chicago were leading weary processions against gun violence on the city’s gang-terrorized South Side. If the Newtown murders were a shock to the system, the regular gun violence that claims hundreds of lives each year in Chicago and other cities across the country has become so “normal” that the mayhem only occasionally warrants the raising of an editorial eyebrow.


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