Brokenness is in the Body of Christ

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Prayer and Sacraments Social Justice Spirituality

The church needs to open its doors to the broken bodies of Christ.

Of all the body parts I didn’t expect my busted knee to affect, it was my eyes. But I’m here to tell you that the first thing that changes when you’re hobbling around is what you see. Specifically, what I see are obstacles: stairs, curbs, uneven pavement, short drops—all of which, if not negotiated properly, result in exquisite little bursts of pain.


The cost of living: Make a change to not short-change others

By Kathy McGourty| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice

Editors' note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


The cost of living: Make a change to not short-change others

By Kathy McGourty| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice

Editors' note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


Who is bearing the brunt of climate change?

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Social Justice
Those least responsible for our flood of climate change concerns are bearing the brunt of the storm.

A year after the twin blows of Hurricane Irene and the great Halloween nor’easter, New Yorkers were treated to what must surely be the worst revival to ever hit the Great White Way. In painfully familiar waves, two vast storms hit town in late October and early November. The devastation wrought by Hurricane Sandy went far beyond Irene’s worst, and the follow-up nor’easter a week later only added to the region’s misery as thousands endured a second week without power or heat.


Who is bearing the brunt of climate change?

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Social Justice
Those least responsible for our flood of climate change concerns are bearing the brunt of the storm.

A year after the twin blows of Hurricane Irene and the great Halloween nor’easter, New Yorkers were treated to what must surely be the worst revival to ever hit the Great White Way. In painfully familiar waves, two vast storms hit town in late October and early November. The devastation wrought by Hurricane Sandy went far beyond Irene’s worst, and the follow-up nor’easter a week later only added to the region’s misery as thousands endured a second week without power or heat.


Out of the ashes: Searching for hope in Benghazi

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics War and Peace
Can an ambassador’s death be the seed of a better future?

The blood of the martyrs is the seed of the church. So what happens when the martyr whose blood is shed happens to be a diplomat? The murder of Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens in Benghazi, Libya was a tragedy on a number of levels—certainly for his family and the field of international diplomacy but most poignantly for the people of Benghazi. Stevens died with and for them, and tragically at the hands of some of them.


The church in Asia: A place for all peoples

By Edmund Chia and Gemma Tulud Cruz| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Social Justice
Fifty years after the opening of the Second Vatican Council, the church faces new challenges. In this final installment of a three-part series,

Read more scholars on today's signs of the times.


Amazon Warrior

By Kathy Coffey| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
Even unto death, Dorothy Stang had no fear in her fight for the poor and the rain forest, and her example inspires us to join the battle.

Just when I thought I’d outgrown mentors, a friend introduced me to David Stang. His enthusiasm for his favorite subject, his sister Dorothy, is contagious.


How much do you really own?

By Barry Hudock| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Catholic teaching says that what's mine is yours when it comes to ownership of private property.

Catholic social teaching used to be called the church’s “best kept secret.” But the secret is getting out in a surprising way. Prominent Catholic Congressman and Republican vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan has invoked it repeatedly in support of his federal budget proposal. Not everyone agreed with his catechism lesson, and the controversy that ensued probably gave Catholic Social Teaching more public attention than any papal encyclical ever did.


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