Out of the ashes: Searching for hope in Benghazi

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics War and Peace
Can an ambassador’s death be the seed of a better future?

The blood of the martyrs is the seed of the church. So what happens when the martyr whose blood is shed happens to be a diplomat? The murder of Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens in Benghazi, Libya was a tragedy on a number of levels—certainly for his family and the field of international diplomacy but most poignantly for the people of Benghazi. Stevens died with and for them, and tragically at the hands of some of them.


The church in Asia: A place for all peoples

By Edmund Chia and Gemma Tulud Cruz| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Scripture and Theology Social Justice
Fifty years after the opening of the Second Vatican Council, the church faces new challenges. In this final installment of a three-part series,

Read more scholars on today's signs of the times.


Amazon Warrior

By Kathy Coffey| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons
Even unto death, Dorothy Stang had no fear in her fight for the poor and the rain forest, and her example inspires us to join the battle.

Just when I thought I’d outgrown mentors, a friend introduced me to David Stang. His enthusiasm for his favorite subject, his sister Dorothy, is contagious.


How much do you really own?

By Barry Hudock| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Catholic teaching says that what's mine is yours when it comes to ownership of private property.

Catholic social teaching used to be called the church’s “best kept secret.” But the secret is getting out in a surprising way. Prominent Catholic Congressman and Republican vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan has invoked it repeatedly in support of his federal budget proposal. Not everyone agreed with his catechism lesson, and the controversy that ensued probably gave Catholic Social Teaching more public attention than any papal encyclical ever did.


How much do you really own?

By Barry Hudock| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Catholic teaching says that what's mine is yours when it comes to ownership of private property.

Catholic social teaching used to be called the church’s “best kept secret.” But the secret is getting out in a surprising way. Prominent Catholic Congressman and Republican vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan has invoked it repeatedly in support of his federal budget proposal. Not everyone agreed with his catechism lesson, and the controversy that ensued probably gave Catholic Social Teaching more public attention than any papal encyclical ever did.


Less isn't more

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Solutions to poverty’s big challenges don’t come in smaller packages.

Less isn't more

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Solutions to poverty’s big challenges don’t come in smaller packages.

We are the world: An interview with Cardinal Peter Turkson

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice Vatican
In its 75 years U.S. Catholic has also covered the global church. Cardinal Peter Turkson of Ghana shares with us how we are all connected. 

When Cardinal Peter Turkson flies from Ghana to Italy, all the passengers are escorted by police to a small entry point at the airport in Rome, where their documents are checked even before they get to immigration.  

“Why all this scrutiny?” Turkson asks. “It is because of where the plane is coming from: Africa.”


We are the world: An interview with Cardinal Peter Turkson

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice Vatican
In its 75 years U.S. Catholic has also covered the global church. Cardinal Peter Turkson of Ghana shares with us how we are all connected. 

When Cardinal Peter Turkson flies from Ghana to Italy, all the passengers are escorted by police to a small entry point at the airport in Rome, where their documents are checked even before they get to immigration.  

“Why all this scrutiny?” Turkson asks. “It is because of where the plane is coming from: Africa.”


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