Father Albert Foley: How one priest took on the KKK

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
A scrappy Jesuit professor found the courage to fight not only the KKK but also the timidity of his own church.

Mobile, Alabama in autumn feels mutable, sunshine floating down on its filigreed iron railings and azalea gardens, then, suddenly, dispiritingly humid. It’s not just the humidity that weighs on you, it’s the history: the lingering horror of slave markets, cross burnings, and even the 1981 lynching of Michael Donald, a 19-year-old African American, chosen at random, who had been walking home from a convenience store.


The high prices of living in poverty

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Avoiding bad choices is a lot easier when you’re not living on a shoestring budget.

What is the cost of being poor in America? Researchers have long known that because of a broad reduction in retail and other consumer choices experienced by America’s poor, it is often simply more expensive to be poor in the United States. Food shopping when you are poor in America doesn’t mean taking the minivan out to Costco; it can mean walking to the only “supermarket” in the neighborhood, often a small corner retail operation with high markups on food and household supplies.


Slideshow: Serving children with disabilities in India

By Jo McGowan| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Twenty years ago, parents of children with disabilities in India had almost nowhere to turn. Since then, what began as one small school has become a game-changer.

We have it on good authority that one child can change history. There is no doubt that Moy Moy did that for my family; many say she did it for the city of Dehradun in the foothills of the Indian Himalayas, too.


Work ethics: How do today's jobs reflect our values?

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ethic of Life Social Justice
We lay off teachers and nurses while we hire for prisons, casinos, and fracking. This is progress?

At least once a week in my daily newspaper I see a full page ad from “the people of America’s oil and gas industry” touting the benefits of fracking, the process through which natural gas is extracted from shale formations using a combination of water and other unnamed chemicals. Always mentioned in these ads are the “millions of jobs” it will create—and that promise alone is sufficient to trump any concerns about the effects of fracking on the surrounding environment.


Taking a stand with America's struggling labor force

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
How much do workers have to celebrate this labor day?

The summer of 2013 may go down as one of the most scorching in recorded history. The blazing sun broke records and spirits from Death Valley to the island of Manhattan. Labor Day may not come soon enough this year for many who will be happy to see such a summer end; among them will be many thousands of American laborers. This summer has been a scorcher as well for working people in the United States.


Special Section: Labor and Worker Justice

Online Editor| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice

If you are not automatically redirected to the special section, please click here.


Why homelessness shouldn't be a crime

By Paula Lomazzi| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
Spending a night sleeping outside shouldn’t lead to a criminal record.

Sounding Boards are one person's take on a many-sided subject and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


How new laws are preventing voters from casting their ballot

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
New laws restricting voting rights hit African Americans and the poor particularly hard. That, of course, is no coincidence.

How new laws are preventing voters from casting their ballot

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
New laws restricting voting rights hit African Americans and the poor particularly hard. That, of course, is no coincidence.

Catholic economics 101: Charles Clark on capitalism, government spending, and alleviating poverty

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice

When the rich get richer and the poor struggle to stay afloat, someone has to step in and level the playing field. And according to economist Charles Clark, no one is better equipped to do that than the government, which by providing goods like education and health care can give everyone a fighting chance. Doing so not only helps the poor, Clark argues, but it benefits all of society, because “sick and stupid is not a good economic policy,” he says.


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