The economics of inequality: Why the wealth gap is bad for everyone

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
Protecting the rich at the expense of the poor isn’t just immoral, says this economist—it is a recipe for economic disaster.

Charles Clark probably doesn’t win a lot of friends in his chosen profession when he says that most economists don’t really understand the economy. But even though he earns a living teaching economics at St. John’s University in New York, Clark believes that understanding how the economy really works requires more than just a classroom education.


The economics of inequality: Why the wealth gap is bad for everyone

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
Protecting the rich at the expense of the poor isn’t just immoral, says this economist—it is a recipe for economic disaster.

Charles Clark probably doesn’t win a lot of friends in his chosen profession when he says that most economists don’t really understand the economy. But even though he earns a living teaching economics at St. John’s University in New York, Clark believes that understanding how the economy really works requires more than just a classroom education.


The true cost of our low-priced clothing

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Buyer beware: That low-priced shirt might have cost someone their life.

New York City made it easier to eat healthier a few years ago by requiring that calorie counts be included on restaurant menus and display boards. What a revelation! Sixteen hundred calories for that moldering pile of corn syrup-infused noodles; 1,300 for the “light” tuna platter? Who knew? Armed with more data, many New Yorkers now wave off that momentarily tempting triple-bacon calorie bomb and opt for something less likely to lead to an early coronary.


The true cost of our low-priced clothing

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Buyer beware: That low-priced shirt might have cost someone their life.

New York City made it easier to eat healthier a few years ago by requiring that calorie counts be included on restaurant menus and display boards. What a revelation! Sixteen hundred calories for that moldering pile of corn syrup-infused noodles; 1,300 for the “light” tuna platter? Who knew? Armed with more data, many New Yorkers now wave off that momentarily tempting triple-bacon calorie bomb and opt for something less likely to lead to an early coronary.


A closer look at the Voting Rights Act

By Kira Dault| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice

While the history of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 truly begins with the founding of the United States, the common practice of slavery, and the Civil War, the legislative history of the law began 100 years before the Voting Rights Act was signed into law.


A closer look at the Voting Rights Act

By Kira Dault| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice

While the history of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 truly begins with the founding of the United States, the common practice of slavery, and the Civil War, the legislative history of the law began 100 years before the Voting Rights Act was signed into law.


The business of helping people: Carolyn Woo on running an international relief agency

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice

As president and CEO of Catholic Relief Services, Carolyn Woo brings a strong sense of leadership and vision to the organization, which was founded by the U.S. Catholic bishops to provide international relief and development assistance. With a background in strategic planning and the experience of serving as dean of a major Catholic business school—the University of Notre Dame’s acclaimed Mendoza College of Business—Woo also brings a sharp business acumen to running an agency dependent upon the support of others to carry out its work.


The business of helping people: Carolyn Woo on running an international relief agency

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice

As president and CEO of Catholic Relief Services, Carolyn Woo brings a strong sense of leadership and vision to the organization, which was founded by the U.S. Catholic bishops to provide international relief and development assistance. With a background in strategic planning and the experience of serving as dean of a major Catholic business school—the University of Notre Dame’s acclaimed Mendoza College of Business—Woo also brings a sharp business acumen to running an agency dependent upon the support of others to carry out its work.


A tribute to the late Father Andrew Greeley

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Article Parish Life Scripture and Theology Social Justice

“It is not surprising,” wrote the editors of U.S. Catholic in the intro to their April 1984 interview with Father Andrew Greeley, that he “is often heard to quote the line from Hilaire Belloc, ‘When I am dead, I hope it may be said, “His sins were scarlet, but his books were read.” ’ ”

Father Greeley died early Thursday morning at his home in Chicago.


Arresting development: The faith community should slow urban sprawl

By Meghan Murphy-Gill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Social Justice

Editors' note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


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