US Catholic Faith in Real Life

Starved for attention: Why budget cuts shouldn't include nixing foreign aid

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
With billions in aid on the chopping block, who is looking out for the world’s poor?

The first hard numbers emerging out of the famine in Somalia are staggering: Between May and August, U.S. aid officials estimate that more than 29,000 children under the age of 5 died in southern Somalia alone. The famine threatens 12 million in the region; the U.N. reports that 640,000 Somali children are acutely malnourished, suggesting the death toll among children is certain to rise.


Urban planting: Turning blight into bounty in the inner city

By Olga Bonfiglio| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
Armed with soil and seeds, Catholics in blighted cities are taking social justice into their own hands.

In Camden, New Jersey a jumble of railroad tracks, freeways, and abandoned factories lace through the Waterfront South area on the Delaware River just across from Philadelphia. During heavy rains, a nearby wastewater treatment plant frequently leaks raw sewage onto the streets.


Parish resources for growing a community garden

By Olga Bonfiglio| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
Practical, hands-on actions are the best way for individuals and faith communities to put their faith into action, says the Michigan Catholic Rural Life Coalition (MCLRC). Here’s how they say to get involved and get growing.
 

Parish Farmer’s Market:


Leave no trace: "Uncontacted" people in South America

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
The modern world threatens the existence of a small group of our own species.

Multinational mining interests, illegal logging, and slash-and-burn agriculture are among the many threats to the fragile ecosystems of South America’s rain forests. Efforts to protect them often cite the important role of rain forests as a preserve of plant and animal biodiversity or focus on their importance as the “lungs of the world.”


The Gospel of Ayn Rand: What's informing budget policy

By John Gehring| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
The politics of radical individualism threatens the common good.

Women and children last: Budget priorities

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
Would we so willingly cut programs for the poor if we knew them by name?

When I was in high school, I bagged groceries for my pocket money, and I often saw a WIC tag next to food items as I restocked shelves: peanut butter, milk, cheese. As a middle-class 16-year-old who never missed a meal, I didn’t even know what WIC stood for (“Women, Infants, and Children”) or that it provided free food to pregnant and nursing mothers and their infants and young children, until my mother told me that it started when she was pregnant with me.


Little house in the big city

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
Can the $300 home add dignity to the lives of the world’s poorest people?

According to U.N. projections, a trend of demographic concentration in the world’s great urban centers will intensify in the coming decades, compressing the world’s poorest into fast arising slums. Viewed today, these too dusty or too muddy, sewage- and garbage-choked ghettos already make an unhealthy, unpleasant sight and a terrible place for the majority of the world’s children to grow up.


What's left in his legacy: John Paul II and social teaching

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
As a voice for peace and justice, Pope John Paul II was a man for all political reasons.

Muslim on Main Street: Akbar Ahmed on American Muslims

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
Once an international diplomat, this scholar now seeks to build bridges between American Muslims and their neighbors.

Akbar Ahmed has written a book of poetry and traveled the world as an anthropologist, but perhaps his most fitting title is ambassador. The former Pakistani ambassador to England, Ahmed has lived his life between cultures.

Growing up in Pakistan, he had great respect for the Catholic priests who educated him. As a young administrator in Waziristan, Pakistan, however, Ahmed also witnessed the ascent of literalist Islam.


Parks and re-Creation

By Megan Sweas| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
A group of young people in the Bronx finds that by beautifying an old eyesore, they’ve unleashed a desire to serve their community.

David Shuffler walks through the park that he helped build in the South Bronx on his way to work.

Grass and young trees line his path through Concrete Plant Park, named after the factory that was once on the site. Some of the old factory structures remain—but they’ve been transformed into public art.


Pages