Special Section: Labor and Worker Justice

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Memories of the March: 10 voices recall 1963 March on Washington

Adelle M. Banks and Corrie Mitchell| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice

c. 2013 Religion News Service

WASHINGTON (RNS) Religion News Service asked participants in the 1963 March on Washington to reflect on their lasting memories of the event and how it shaped their faith. Their comments have been edited for length and clarity.


Is the war on drugs a just war?

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice War and Peace
The war on drugs isn’t working. In fact, it is making the problem even worse.

In May President Barack Obama signaled the beginning of the end of the war on terror, at least in a predominantly militarized form, during an address that attempted to balance encroachments on civil and human rights created by the nation’s anti-terror crusade against the legitimate, reasonable needs of security and tranquility. Is it time for the president to stand before the nation and make a similar speech about another war it has been waging, the horizonless war on drugs?


Help wanted: Parishes offer assistance to the unemployed

By Laura Fletcher| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Social Justice
Stuck in the job hunt with seemingly few prospects? Maybe your parish can offer some advice.

Poverty comes to Wisteria Lane: Serving the new suburban poor

By Meghan Murphy-Gill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Numbers of poor people in the suburbs are growing twice as fast as their city counterparts. But many of these picket-fence poor don’t know where to get help—or can’t bring themselves to ask.

When Ellen got the phone call from Hope House, a long-term homeless shelter in Villa Park, Illinois, confirming an available room, she was overcome with relief. “The tears just flowed,” she says. “Even the woman on the other end was crying.”


Why homelessness shouldn't be a crime

By Paula Lomazzi| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
Spending a night sleeping outside shouldn’t lead to a criminal record.

Sounding Boards are one person's take on a many-sided subject and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


How new laws are preventing voters from casting their ballot

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
New laws restricting voting rights hit African Americans and the poor particularly hard. That, of course, is no coincidence.

How new laws are preventing voters from casting their ballot

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
New laws restricting voting rights hit African Americans and the poor particularly hard. That, of course, is no coincidence.

Catholic economics 101: Charles Clark on capitalism, government spending, and alleviating poverty

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice

When the rich get richer and the poor struggle to stay afloat, someone has to step in and level the playing field. And according to economist Charles Clark, no one is better equipped to do that than the government, which by providing goods like education and health care can give everyone a fighting chance. Doing so not only helps the poor, Clark argues, but it benefits all of society, because “sick and stupid is not a good economic policy,” he says.


Catholic economics 101: Charles Clark on capitalism, government spending, and alleviating poverty

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice

When the rich get richer and the poor struggle to stay afloat, someone has to step in and level the playing field. And according to economist Charles Clark, no one is better equipped to do that than the government, which by providing goods like education and health care can give everyone a fighting chance. Doing so not only helps the poor, Clark argues, but it benefits all of society, because “sick and stupid is not a good economic policy,” he says.


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