They can do it

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice Women
Third World women could be the new recruits in the global war on poverty.

 

Since commodities first changed hands for cash, the women among us have worked hard for the money-often, as they still do today in the developing world, putting in a full day of labor in the field before heading back for a second job keeping the homestead humming. Heck, most of the time they've worked hard for no money at all, since the work that women have done as mothers, caregivers, agriculturalists, and household CEOs frequently went uncompensated.


They can do it

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice Women
Third World women could be the new recruits in the global war on poverty.

 

Since commodities first changed hands for cash, the women among us have worked hard for the money-often, as they still do today in the developing world, putting in a full day of labor in the field before heading back for a second job keeping the homestead humming. Heck, most of the time they've worked hard for no money at all, since the work that women have done as mothers, caregivers, agriculturalists, and household CEOs frequently went uncompensated.


Dispatches from Decatur

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Community is the first casualty in America's labor wars

It's been one roller-coaster ride to hell, and it's still going down.-a Staley worker

The union guys are gone from the gates, their run-down folding chairs with them. The long days spent bearing witness to their grievances in a slow monotonous circle are finished. The days spent trying to keep warm around smoky oil drums in the winter or sweating through their T-shirts in the summer are ended. 


Dispatches from Decatur

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Community is the first casualty in America's labor wars

It's been one roller-coaster ride to hell, and it's still going down.-a Staley worker

The union guys are gone from the gates, their run-down folding chairs with them. The long days spent bearing witness to their grievances in a slow monotonous circle are finished. The days spent trying to keep warm around smoky oil drums in the winter or sweating through their T-shirts in the summer are ended. 


Troubled waters

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Billions of the world's poorest are being denied even the most basic natural resource.

 

Most of us in the west have grown used to thinking about scarcity and conservation when we switch on the heat in our homes or turn the key in our car ignitions. But in the developing world it's not filling up the Humvee that keeps parents up at night; it's finding enough clean water to get through the next day.


Troubled waters

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Billions of the world's poorest are being denied even the most basic natural resource.

 

Most of us in the west have grown used to thinking about scarcity and conservation when we switch on the heat in our homes or turn the key in our car ignitions. But in the developing world it's not filling up the Humvee that keeps parents up at night; it's finding enough clean water to get through the next day.


Be our guest?

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Immigration
The U.S. should be a good host and protect the migrant workers who knock on our door.

 

In the colonial period the destitute and desperate escaping the poverty of European backwaters made their way to America as indentured servants, signing away the only commodity they had to offer: themselves. Frequently used up to the end of human endurance by their "employers," these earliest members of America's working class experienced a dehumanization that was only exceeded by the treatment of Africans brought over as slaves.


How quickly we forget

By Brett C. Hoover| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Immigration
We owe it to today's immigrants to be honest about the difficulties and prejudices against the huddled masses who came before them.

On my father's side, my great-great grandparents came to this country from Germany sometime in the middle of the 19th century. What their Catholic immigrant lives were like, I could not say. Their stories lie too far back in the generations, lost in the mist of history.


Spit that out!

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Tainted foods from the agricultural-industrial complex are giving new meaning to your favorite casserole "surprise."

Never again, yet again

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice War and Peace
  
Unless action replaces delay, our denunciations of genocide are nothing but talk.


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