Social justice for dummies

By Joe Sullivan| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice

Includes bonus information on:

  • The easy way to know the difference between justice and charity
  • The pitfalls that lead to "fringe-ism"
  • What's in it for you

"He's on the Social-Justice Committee," she said, a sound of fear, wariness, even a little contempt in her voice. Here, in the middle of a parish potluck dinner, that phrase came up again. Social justice.


The trouble with Saint Dorothy

By Jim Forest| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article

Can you think of a word that describes a person who devoted much of her life to being with people many of us cross the street to avoid? Who for half a century did her best to make sure they didn't go hungry or freeze on winter nights? Who went to Mass every day until her legs couldn't take her that far, at which point Communion was brought to her? Who prayed every day for friend and enemy alike, and whose prayers, some are convinced, had miraculous results? Who went to Confession every week? Who was devoted to the rosary? Who wore hand-me-downs and lived in cold-waterflats?


Why we can't afford to close Catholic schools

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice

It's pretty subdued day at Our Lady of Mercy School on Chicago's Northwest Side. Most of the kids are in class, huddled over Terra Nova achievement tests; George and Julio are "timing out" on a bench just outside the lunchroom but still smiling mischievously at each passerby; a Commonwealth Edison crew is cleaning up the mess after somebody crashed into a light pole beside the side entrance the night before; and principal Debbie Sullivan is in her office by an ancient Rich public address machine worrying over how the school is going to make ends meet.


Why we can't afford to close Catholic schools

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice

It's pretty subdued day at Our Lady of Mercy School on Chicago's Northwest Side. Most of the kids are in class, huddled over Terra Nova achievement tests; George and Julio are "timing out" on a bench just outside the lunchroom but still smiling mischievously at each passerby; a Commonwealth Edison crew is cleaning up the mess after somebody crashed into a light pole beside the side entrance the night before; and principal Debbie Sullivan is in her office by an ancient Rich public address machine worrying over how the school is going to make ends meet.


Not-so-special delivery

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment
Sometimes the toxic waste is not just in babies' diapers.

The samples reviewed by the researchers at the Washington based Environmental Working Group contained on average more than 200 contaminants. Among them mercury, gasoline, waste by-products from coal and garbage burning, toxic traces of eight petroleum-based chemicals, carcinogenic residue from dozens of widely used flame retardants, pesticides, and much more.


Our sisters' keeper

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice Women
A recent United Nations report offers a sobering assessment on the condition of women.

 


Good news in the mission field

By Meinrad Scherer-Emunds| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice

Over the past half-century the Catholic approach to mission has shifted dramatically. Today's Catholic missionaries continue to proclaim the Good News, but most do so in a far more open and respectful encounter and dialogue with the cultures and people they engage. Their witness invites people to a more subtle-and at the same time more profound-"conversion."


My greatest hope

By Archbishop Rembert G. Weakland| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Ethic of Life Social Justice Spirituality War and Peace Women

Archbishop Rembert G. Weakland, O.S.B. on the church in the world
People all over this globe, with all their racial and cultural differences, have to learn to live together in peace and work for the common good of all. My hope would be that the church would show by example how people of different cultures and races can respect one an-other's legitimate differences and live as a creative global organism.


''Brothers and Sisters to Us''

U.S. Catholic| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice

Racism is a sin: a sin that divides the human family, blots out the image of God among specific members of the family, and violates the fundamental human dignity of those called to be children of the same Father. Racism is the sin that says some human beings are inherently superior and others essentially inferior because of race. It is the sin that makes racial characteristics the determining factor for the exercise of human rights. . . .


There is a balm in Tapologo: AIDS in South Africa

By Tara K. Dix| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Ravaged by HIV/AIDS, women and children from a South African squatter camp find hope at a volunteer-run clinic.

 

Two years ago Selinah was lying on a mat at the altar of the Catholic mission in Phokeng, South Africa. Weighing only 86 pounds, she shivered with fever as the AIDS virus took over her body. Surrounded by other patients of the Tapologo AIDS Hospice, run by the Catholic Diocese of Rustenburg, she prayed for her life as the community anointed her.


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