Help wanted: Parishes offer assistance to the unemployed

By Laura Fletcher| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Social Justice
Stuck in the job hunt with seemingly few prospects? Maybe your parish can offer some advice.

Poverty comes to Wisteria Lane: Serving the new suburban poor

By Meghan Murphy-Gill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Numbers of poor people in the suburbs are growing twice as fast as their city counterparts. But many of these picket-fence poor don’t know where to get help—or can’t bring themselves to ask.

When Ellen got the phone call from Hope House, a long-term homeless shelter in Villa Park, Illinois, confirming an available room, she was overcome with relief. “The tears just flowed,” she says. “Even the woman on the other end was crying.”


Why homelessness shouldn't be a crime

By Paula Lomazzi| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
Spending a night sleeping outside shouldn’t lead to a criminal record.

Sounding Boards are one person's take on a many-sided subject and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


How new laws are preventing voters from casting their ballot

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
New laws restricting voting rights hit African Americans and the poor particularly hard. That, of course, is no coincidence.

How new laws are preventing voters from casting their ballot

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
New laws restricting voting rights hit African Americans and the poor particularly hard. That, of course, is no coincidence.

Catholic economics 101: Charles Clark on capitalism, government spending, and alleviating poverty

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice

When the rich get richer and the poor struggle to stay afloat, someone has to step in and level the playing field. And according to economist Charles Clark, no one is better equipped to do that than the government, which by providing goods like education and health care can give everyone a fighting chance. Doing so not only helps the poor, Clark argues, but it benefits all of society, because “sick and stupid is not a good economic policy,” he says.


Catholic economics 101: Charles Clark on capitalism, government spending, and alleviating poverty

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice

When the rich get richer and the poor struggle to stay afloat, someone has to step in and level the playing field. And according to economist Charles Clark, no one is better equipped to do that than the government, which by providing goods like education and health care can give everyone a fighting chance. Doing so not only helps the poor, Clark argues, but it benefits all of society, because “sick and stupid is not a good economic policy,” he says.


The economics of inequality: Why the wealth gap is bad for everyone

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
Protecting the rich at the expense of the poor isn’t just immoral, says this economist—it is a recipe for economic disaster.

Charles Clark probably doesn’t win a lot of friends in his chosen profession when he says that most economists don’t really understand the economy. But even though he earns a living teaching economics at St. John’s University in New York, Clark believes that understanding how the economy really works requires more than just a classroom education.


The economics of inequality: Why the wealth gap is bad for everyone

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
Protecting the rich at the expense of the poor isn’t just immoral, says this economist—it is a recipe for economic disaster.

Charles Clark probably doesn’t win a lot of friends in his chosen profession when he says that most economists don’t really understand the economy. But even though he earns a living teaching economics at St. John’s University in New York, Clark believes that understanding how the economy really works requires more than just a classroom education.


The true cost of our low-priced clothing

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Buyer beware: That low-priced shirt might have cost someone their life.

New York City made it easier to eat healthier a few years ago by requiring that calorie counts be included on restaurant menus and display boards. What a revelation! Sixteen hundred calories for that moldering pile of corn syrup-infused noodles; 1,300 for the “light” tuna platter? Who knew? Armed with more data, many New Yorkers now wave off that momentarily tempting triple-bacon calorie bomb and opt for something less likely to lead to an early coronary.


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