Value added? Catholic professional schools

By Leslie Scanlon| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice Young Adults
The jury’s out on whether Catholic law and business schools give students a higher degree of faith.

When Brian Chan was applying to graduate business schools in 2002, finding a Catholic university was not on his wish list at all.

“I applied to the programs that had the biggest names—Harvard, Stanford, Wharton,” Chan says. “I didn’t consider whether they were Catholic or not. I went for the higher rankings.”


Papal prescription for universal health care

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
The pope’s stance on health care may be hard pill to swallow for opponents of reform.

More than 100 million people a year across the world are driven into poverty because of the cost of illness or “catastrophic injury,” the United Nations reported in November. Whether in the affluent or the developing world, nations that rely on individual resources to sustain health care systems (rather than pooled government resources) produced the highest amount of health-related impoverishment among their citizens.


Papal prescription for universal health care

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
The pope’s stance on health care may be hard pill to swallow for opponents of reform.

More than 100 million people a year across the world are driven into poverty because of the cost of illness or “catastrophic injury,” the United Nations reported in November. Whether in the affluent or the developing world, nations that rely on individual resources to sustain health care systems (rather than pooled government resources) produced the highest amount of health-related impoverishment among their citizens.


Don't focus on the family: Julie Hanlon Rubio on family ethics

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family Social Justice
Are full family schedules masking emptiness of spirit? A Catholic ethicist and suburban mom challenges families to make time for the really important stuff.

Because Julie Hanlon Rubio’s father was a civil rights attorney, the family’s dinner table discussions during her childhood often revolved around his work. “Just having that consciousness rather than always talking about our own lives was important for all of us,” she says.


Change we can believe in: The pope, condoms, and church teaching

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Sex and Sexuality Social Justice Vatican
Church teaching is the same always and everywhere—except when it isn’t.

Using the words “pope” and “condom” in the same sentence is bound to draw attention; when it’s the pope himself using the latter word in a sentence of his own, the world takes notice.


Our ladies of Haiti: Slideshow

By J.D. Long-García| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice Women




 


Our ladies of Haiti: Slideshow

By J.D. Long-García| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice Women




 


Our Ladies of Haiti

By J.D. Long-García| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice Women
A year after an earthquake killed more than 230,000, Haiti rebuilds its communities on a strong foundation: the country’s brave and faithful women.

To get to her house, Marie Josil walks through a blue tarp camp, where hundreds of Haitians set up makeshift shelters after the January 12, 2010 earthquake tumbled their homes. Where the tent city ends, the cinderblock neighborhood begins.

Her house, a two-room concrete building crammed between a pile of rubble and another home, smells of sewage. But she doesn’t notice. This is how it’s always been.


Our Ladies of Haiti

By J.D. Long-García| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice Women
A year after an earthquake killed more than 230,000, Haiti rebuilds its communities on a strong foundation: the country’s brave and faithful women.

To get to her house, Marie Josil walks through a blue tarp camp, where hundreds of Haitians set up makeshift shelters after the January 12, 2010 earthquake tumbled their homes. Where the tent city ends, the cinderblock neighborhood begins.

Her house, a two-room concrete building crammed between a pile of rubble and another home, smells of sewage. But she doesn’t notice. This is how it’s always been.


Broke in the burbs: America's new poverty problem

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
The country’s cities may no longer be the epicenters of poverty.

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