Muslim on Main Street: Akbar Ahmed on American Muslims

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ecumenical & Interfaith Dialogue
Once an international diplomat, this scholar now seeks to build bridges between American Muslims and their neighbors.

Akbar Ahmed has written a book of poetry and traveled the world as an anthropologist, but perhaps his most fitting title is ambassador. The former Pakistani ambassador to England, Ahmed has lived his life between cultures.

Growing up in Pakistan, he had great respect for the Catholic priests who educated him. As a young administrator in Waziristan, Pakistan, however, Ahmed also witnessed the ascent of literalist Islam.


Parks and re-Creation

By Megan Sweas| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment
A group of young people in the Bronx finds that by beautifying an old eyesore, they’ve unleashed a desire to serve their community.

David Shuffler walks through the park that he helped build in the South Bronx on his way to work.

Grass and young trees line his path through Concrete Plant Park, named after the factory that was once on the site. Some of the old factory structures remain—but they’ve been transformed into public art.


Don't be crude: End our oil addiction

By Dan Misleh| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article
It’s time to get the petroleum monkey off our backs.

Don't be crude: End our oil addiction

By Daniel Misleh| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment
It’s time to get the petroleum monkey off our backs.

Hello, my name is Dan, and I’m addicted to oil.

I recently looked around me to catalog all the things made from oil. The plastics in and of themselves were almost too numerous to count: milk and juice bottles, plastic cups and plates, office chair legs and arms, computer keys and appliance shells, bags and assorted containers, the car dashboard, the land-line and cell phones, plastic folders, files, notebooks, and even many of the fabrics that make up my clothing. The plastics list is endless.


Collateral damage: Microloans gone bad

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
If profit is the prime motive, the poor will always get the raw end of the deal. 

Collateral damage: Microloans gone bad

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
If profit is the prime motive, the poor will always get the raw end of the deal. 

Still separate and unequal

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Jonathan Kozol, a fourth grade public school teacher in Boston who had devoted himself to issues of education and social justice in America. Kozol discusses his new book, "Ordinary Resurrections: Children in the Years of Hope," misconceptions in the school policy debate, and vouchers for private schools.

Catholics should hang out with poor people

Online Editor| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
It's not enough to write a few checks to charity. If Christians take their faith seriously, they must spend actual face-to-face time with people who are poor. It took Sister Helen Prejean a while to realize this, but now she believes its as essential as going to Mass.

Value added? Catholic professional schools

By Leslie Scanlon| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice Young Adults
The jury’s out on whether Catholic law and business schools give students a higher degree of faith.

When Brian Chan was applying to graduate business schools in 2002, finding a Catholic university was not on his wish list at all.

“I applied to the programs that had the biggest names—Harvard, Stanford, Wharton,” Chan says. “I didn’t consider whether they were Catholic or not. I went for the higher rankings.”


Papal prescription for universal health care

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
The pope’s stance on health care may be hard pill to swallow for opponents of reform.

More than 100 million people a year across the world are driven into poverty because of the cost of illness or “catastrophic injury,” the United Nations reported in November. Whether in the affluent or the developing world, nations that rely on individual resources to sustain health care systems (rather than pooled government resources) produced the highest amount of health-related impoverishment among their citizens.


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