Best practices for charity and justice

By Jack Jezreel| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Social Justice
Social ministry is the job of the entire parish community. What are we waiting for?

As the implications of the gospel, baptism, Vatican II, and, specifically, the recognition of the responsibilities that come with being seized by God’s love and Spirit unfold, the American Catholic parish has slowly but surely moved in the direction of being more deliberate about beckoning and organizing its members to engage in the needs of the world, both local and faraway. It’s called parish social ministry. Admittedly, it’s a work in progress.


Ash Wednesday: Lent calls us to look inward—and to focus on community as well

By Carolyn Woo| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Saints, Feasts, and Seasons Social Justice

An important lesson that I learned about Lent actually came from a Jewish friend. While working at Purdue University, I served under Dr. Robert Ringel, a devout man who approached his religious observances with deep care. In the first year that I worked for him, he came into my office to seek forgiveness for any wrong he may have done me. This was part of his preparation for Yom Kippur, a high holy day for the Jewish people and a day of atonement for sins against God and his people.


Danger zone: Do our workplaces value human dignity?

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ethic of Life Social Justice
Employers are falling down on the job when it comes to ensuring worker safety.

Problems women face in a broken prison system

By Laura Fletcher| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice Women
One woman’s experience of incarceration exposed her to many of the issues emblematic of our country’s problems with prisons.

Tips for employers of domestic workers

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Before hiring a worker in your home, ask the following questions to make sure you’re taking care of your caretaker.

Let's get organized: Domestic workers fight for their rights

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice Women
Deemed indispensable by the families who hire them, why are domestic workers excluded from legal protection?

When Juana Flores first arrived in the United States from Mexico 27 years ago, she found a job taking care of a child for what seemed like a huge amount of money: $75 every two weeks. After the first two months, her employers told Flores that she would need to care for two additional children. “A few months after that, the first boy’s father began to intimidate me, to insult me, and talk to me in suggestive ways,” says Flores, speaking through a translator.


When Mom is in prison: Supporting incarcerated women and their children

By Laura Fletcher| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice Women
Kids often face the stiffest sentence when their mother is behind bars. But support networks are helping to rehabilitate family relationships that have fallen on hard times.

Working toward systemic change in the church today

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice

Sister Nancy Sylvester has grown accustomed to the fact that life often takes unexpected turns. When Sylvester entered the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary at the tail end of the Second Vatican Council, she experienced firsthand a whirlwind change for women religious that dramatically shifted the course of her own life. That change led Sylvester to Washington, where she became immersed in politics and served for 10 years as executive director of the Catholic social justice lobby NETWORK.


From piety to politics: The evolution of an American sister

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice Women
When she entered religious life, Sister Nancy Sylvester, I.H.M. expected to get a habit and a new name. Instead she got a call to action.

As Nancy Sylvester went through her high school years, she dreamed of someday being like the Immaculate Heart of Mary sisters she had known since childhood: pious and prayerful, living in community, wearing the order’s traditional blue habit. She would even get to choose a new name.


Erich March: The unexpected grocer

By Nicholas Liao| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
When poor diets caused too many early deaths in an urban community, a solution came from an unlikely source—the local mortician.

As a 61-year-old mortician, Erich March wasn’t interested in joining a food trend. You won’t hear any mentions of Michael Pollan or locavorism from March, even as he beams about Apples & Oranges Fresh Market, the health-oriented grocery store he and his wife, Michele Speaks-March, opened in their East Baltimore neighborhood earlier this year.


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