Problems women face in a broken prison system

By Laura Fletcher| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice Women
One woman’s experience of incarceration exposed her to many of the issues emblematic of our country’s problems with prisons.

Tips for employers of domestic workers

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Before hiring a worker in your home, ask the following questions to make sure you’re taking care of your caretaker.

Let's get organized: Domestic workers fight for their rights

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice Women
Deemed indispensable by the families who hire them, why are domestic workers excluded from legal protection?

When Juana Flores first arrived in the United States from Mexico 27 years ago, she found a job taking care of a child for what seemed like a huge amount of money: $75 every two weeks. After the first two months, her employers told Flores that she would need to care for two additional children. “A few months after that, the first boy’s father began to intimidate me, to insult me, and talk to me in suggestive ways,” says Flores, speaking through a translator.


When Mom is in prison: Supporting incarcerated women and their children

By Laura Fletcher| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice Women
Kids often face the stiffest sentence when their mother is behind bars. But support networks are helping to rehabilitate family relationships that have fallen on hard times.

Working toward systemic change in the church today

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice

Sister Nancy Sylvester has grown accustomed to the fact that life often takes unexpected turns. When Sylvester entered the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary at the tail end of the Second Vatican Council, she experienced firsthand a whirlwind change for women religious that dramatically shifted the course of her own life. That change led Sylvester to Washington, where she became immersed in politics and served for 10 years as executive director of the Catholic social justice lobby NETWORK.


From piety to politics: The evolution of an American sister

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice Women
When she entered religious life, Sister Nancy Sylvester, I.H.M. expected to get a habit and a new name. Instead she got a call to action.

As Nancy Sylvester went through her high school years, she dreamed of someday being like the Immaculate Heart of Mary sisters she had known since childhood: pious and prayerful, living in community, wearing the order’s traditional blue habit. She would even get to choose a new name.


Erich March: The unexpected grocer

By Nicholas Liao| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
When poor diets caused too many early deaths in an urban community, a solution came from an unlikely source—the local mortician.

As a 61-year-old mortician, Erich March wasn’t interested in joining a food trend. You won’t hear any mentions of Michael Pollan or locavorism from March, even as he beams about Apples & Oranges Fresh Market, the health-oriented grocery store he and his wife, Michele Speaks-March, opened in their East Baltimore neighborhood earlier this year.


Evaluating the status of the Millennium Development Goals

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
An end to global poverty and suffering is in sight, but much more work remains.

In a world awash with suffering and sorrow—the ongoing humanitarian catastrophe that is Syria comes quickly to mind—there is often little opportunity to comment on any good news. But human progress, however unsteady, should be acknowledged and celebrated. And in September there was some good news during the 68th United Nations General Assembly.


Father Albert Foley: How one priest took on the KKK

By Kristen Hannum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
A scrappy Jesuit professor found the courage to fight not only the KKK but also the timidity of his own church.

Mobile, Alabama in autumn feels mutable, sunshine floating down on its filigreed iron railings and azalea gardens, then, suddenly, dispiritingly humid. It’s not just the humidity that weighs on you, it’s the history: the lingering horror of slave markets, cross burnings, and even the 1981 lynching of Michael Donald, a 19-year-old African American, chosen at random, who had been walking home from a convenience store.


The high prices of living in poverty

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Avoiding bad choices is a lot easier when you’re not living on a shoestring budget.

What is the cost of being poor in America? Researchers have long known that because of a broad reduction in retail and other consumer choices experienced by America’s poor, it is often simply more expensive to be poor in the United States. Food shopping when you are poor in America doesn’t mean taking the minivan out to Costco; it can mean walking to the only “supermarket” in the neighborhood, often a small corner retail operation with high markups on food and household supplies.


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