Leave no trace: "Uncontacted" people in South America

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Social Justice
The modern world threatens the existence of a small group of our own species.

Multinational mining interests, illegal logging, and slash-and-burn agriculture are among the many threats to the fragile ecosystems of South America’s rain forests. Efforts to protect them often cite the important role of rain forests as a preserve of plant and animal biodiversity or focus on their importance as the “lungs of the world.”


Leave no trace: "Uncontacted" people in South America

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Social Justice
The modern world threatens the existence of a small group of our own species.

Multinational mining interests, illegal logging, and slash-and-burn agriculture are among the many threats to the fragile ecosystems of South America’s rain forests. Efforts to protect them often cite the important role of rain forests as a preserve of plant and animal biodiversity or focus on their importance as the “lungs of the world.”


The Gospel of Ayn Rand: What's informing budget policy

By John Gehring| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
The politics of radical individualism threatens the common good.

The Gospel of Ayn Rand: What's informing budget policy

By John Gehring| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
The politics of radical individualism threatens the common good.

Take no chances: Survey on church gambling

By Beth Haile| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Parish Life Social Justice

Editors' note: Sounding Board is one person’s take on a many-sided subject and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of U.S. Catholic, its editors, or the Claretians.


Women and children last: Budget priorities

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
Would we so willingly cut programs for the poor if we knew them by name?

When I was in high school, I bagged groceries for my pocket money, and I often saw a WIC tag next to food items as I restocked shelves: peanut butter, milk, cheese. As a middle-class 16-year-old who never missed a meal, I didn’t even know what WIC stood for (“Women, Infants, and Children”) or that it provided free food to pregnant and nursing mothers and their infants and young children, until my mother told me that it started when she was pregnant with me.


Women and children last: Budget priorities

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
Would we so willingly cut programs for the poor if we knew them by name?

When I was in high school, I bagged groceries for my pocket money, and I often saw a WIC tag next to food items as I restocked shelves: peanut butter, milk, cheese. As a middle-class 16-year-old who never missed a meal, I didn’t even know what WIC stood for (“Women, Infants, and Children”) or that it provided free food to pregnant and nursing mothers and their infants and young children, until my mother told me that it started when she was pregnant with me.


Little house in the big city

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Can the $300 home add dignity to the lives of the world’s poorest people?

According to U.N. projections, a trend of demographic concentration in the world’s great urban centers will intensify in the coming decades, compressing the world’s poorest into fast arising slums. Viewed today, these too dusty or too muddy, sewage- and garbage-choked ghettos already make an unhealthy, unpleasant sight and a terrible place for the majority of the world’s children to grow up.


Little house in the big city

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Can the $300 home add dignity to the lives of the world’s poorest people?

According to U.N. projections, a trend of demographic concentration in the world’s great urban centers will intensify in the coming decades, compressing the world’s poorest into fast arising slums. Viewed today, these too dusty or too muddy, sewage- and garbage-choked ghettos already make an unhealthy, unpleasant sight and a terrible place for the majority of the world’s children to grow up.


What's left in his legacy: John Paul II and social teaching

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Vatican
As a voice for peace and justice, Pope John Paul II was a man for all political reasons.

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