Inside a Bangladesh garment factory

By David Snyder| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Meet the woman who makes Walmart’s low-priced clothes. She works 10-hour days for $103 per month. And her factory is one of the good ones.

Power to the public workers

By Meghan J. Clark| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Should a librarian have any less of a right to unionize than an auto worker or a nurse?

In 1981 my grandmother, a librarian, became a union organizer. The director at her library had become increasingly erratic and dictatorial. This wasn’t a traditional case of exploitation or unsafe working conditions in a private factory or store—it was the public library. A welcoming community center had been transformed into a hostile work environment.


COMMENTARY: Freedom Summer volunteers inspired by more than just idealism

By Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Culture Social Justice

c. 2014 Religion News Service

(RNS) On June 2, 1964, while hundreds of Freedom Summer volunteers were still finishing their training in Oxford, Ohio, three civil rights workers went missing in Neshoba County, Miss.

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee field secretary Bob Moses was charged with leading the project that would organize poor, black Mississippians to challenge the power structure of the South and upset the Democratic National Convention.


Strength in numbers: The power of community organizing

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Social Justice
If a community wants things to change, sometimes they have to be willing to get together and track mud on the carpets of city hall.

The other African crisis

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Africa is making headlines, but one of its gravest tragedies remains overlooked.

The places they'll go: Nuns working on the margins

By Catherine O'Connell-Cahill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice Women
The tough and tender mercies of women religious transform the most remote and desolate corners of poverty, misery, and heartache.

It takes nerves of steel to stand in your doorway and tell rebel soldiers waving guns that no, the woman they are seeking is most certainly not in the room behind you, when in fact she is hiding a few feet away, under your bed. But that’s what Sister Rosemary Nyirumbe did.


Paul Ryan's letter to the poor

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Social Justice
Paul Ryan says he has a cure for poverty, but the evidence says otherwise.

Pity poor Paul Ryan. Even as the Wisconsin congressman tries to reinvent himself as a conservative champion of the poor, he still finds a way to get into trouble with a speech about the pathologies of American inner-city life that sounded to critics a lot like coded references to race.


High and dry: Water poverty in the United States

By George McGraw| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Environment Social Justice
Some of us take for granted the most precious resource of all. Lack of water harms families not only in the Third World, but also here at home.

It’s 9 a.m. in the high desert of rural New Mexico, and the heat is already oppressive. People begin their day as you might expect: grabbing backpacks and heading to school, feeding goats and watering horses, patching holes in fences or crawling under cars to make small repairs. There is plenty to do.


Protecting migrant children requires compassion without borders

By Kevin Clarke| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Immigration Social Justice
Growing numbers of unaccompanied minors are risking their lives to escape their dangerous homelands. Will we offer them safe harbor?

How Catholic colleges can and should help DREAMers

By Donna M. Carroll| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Hispanic Catholics Immigration Social Justice Young Adults
One university president shares tips on how to welcome and support undocumented students.

My involvement with immigration reform started with one student on a bicycle in a snow storm. How else, I learned, could he get to school without a driver’s license, which was not an option for an undocumented student in Illinois in 2007? Neither was a campus job, though he was an honors student majoring in economics. He asked for my help, tentatively at first—not for himself, but for the dream of citizenship—and so it all began.


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