Do I need an advance directive?

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ethic of Life Faith and Science Spirituality
Daniel Sulmasy discusses preparing your family for how to respond to a health crisis when you can't.

What kind of advance directives do you recommend?

I strongly recommend a health care proxy or durable power of attorney for health care. A living will may be OK if you don't have anybody else to speak for you or have very specific wishes.


Internal medicine: End of life ethics with Dr. Daniel Sulmasy, O.F.M.

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ethic of Life Faith and Science Spirituality
The debate about death with dignity needs the wisdom of the Catholic spiritual tradition, says this physician and bioethicist.

Do I need an advance directive?

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ethic of Life Faith and Science Spirituality
Daniel Sulmasy discusses preparing your family for how to respond to a health crisis when you can't.

What kind of advance directives do you recommend?

I strongly recommend a health care proxy or durable power of attorney for health care. A living will may be OK if you don't have anybody else to speak for you or have very specific wishes.


Pastoral discretion advised: Is excommunication the best response?

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ethic of Life
Law must always be tempered by mercy if justice is to be truly served.

Excommunication was once considered a passé feature of the ancient church, conjuring up images of the Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV walking barefoot in the snow in 1077 to Canossa to seek the mercy of Pope Gregory VII. Or perhaps one thinks of the memorable scene from Becket, when Richard Burton's Archbishop Thomas, with no lack of ceremony, turns his authority against Peter O'Toole's King Henry II.


Pastoral discretion advised: Is excommunication the best response?

By Bryan Cones| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ethic of Life
Law must always be tempered by mercy if justice is to be truly served.

Excommunication was once considered a passé feature of the ancient church, conjuring up images of the Holy Roman Emperor Henry IV walking barefoot in the snow in 1077 to Canossa to seek the mercy of Pope Gregory VII. Or perhaps one thinks of the memorable scene from Becket, when Richard Burton's Archbishop Thomas, with no lack of ceremony, turns his authority against Peter O'Toole's King Henry II.


It's time to take our medicine: An interview with Sister Carol Keehan, D.C.

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ethic of Life Politics Social Justice
Health care reform is about more than reducing insurance premiums, says this Catholic health care executive. It’s about caring for the sick.

On March 5, 2009, Sister Carol Keehan, a Daughter of Charity and president of the Catholic Health Association (CHA), which represents more than 600 Catholic hospitals and medical facilities, participated in a White House roundtable on health care reform. The gathering included members of Congress, journalists, and invited interested parties, such as Keehan.


It's time to take our medicine: An interview with Sister Carol Keehan, D.C.

By A U.S. Catholic interview| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ethic of Life Politics Social Justice
Health care reform is about more than reducing insurance premiums, says this Catholic health care executive. It’s about caring for the sick.

On March 5, 2009, Sister Carol Keehan, a Daughter of Charity and president of the Catholic Health Association (CHA), which represents more than 600 Catholic hospitals and medical facilities, participated in a White House roundtable on health care reform. The gathering included members of Congress, journalists, and invited interested parties, such as Keehan.


A Catholic doctor’s Good Samaritan plan

By Michael Grady| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ethic of Life Social Justice
When I give talks on health care reform to faith communities, I often use the parable of the Good Samaritan.

After the priest and the Levite have passed by an injured traveler, the Samaritan man is moved with compassion, providing first aid and then medical care for the stranger. The parable poignantly exemplifies the core tenet of our Catholic social teaching: the respect for human dignity. Sadly, the United States is alone among industrialized societies in its failure to recognize the fundamental right to health care that human dignity demands.


A Catholic doctor’s Good Samaritan plan

By Michael Grady| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ethic of Life Social Justice
When I give talks on health care reform to faith communities, I often use the parable of the Good Samaritan.

After the priest and the Levite have passed by an injured traveler, the Samaritan man is moved with compassion, providing first aid and then medical care for the stranger. The parable poignantly exemplifies the core tenet of our Catholic social teaching: the respect for human dignity. Sadly, the United States is alone among industrialized societies in its failure to recognize the fundamental right to health care that human dignity demands.


Michael Denson: Walking the last mile with death row inmates

By Michelle Bearden| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Ethic of Life

Michael Denson lives in a state where 87 percent of the residents support the death penalty.

As far as the Frisco, Texas man is concerned, that's all the more reason for him to devote his spare hours to serving a population that his fellow Texans would just as soon see disappear.


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