Draft horse

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
Steven Spielberg’s latest film is a testament to war’s silent soldier.

“Home is the sailor, home from the sea, and the hunter home from the hill,” wrote Robert Louis Stevenson in his poem “Requiem.” But when, we have wondered since Homer penned The Odyssey, will the soldier be home from the war? Will those who come back from war ever really get all the way home? This is a question that haunts our greatest contemporary filmmaker.


The Oscars! Read our reviews of the best picture nominees

Meghan Murphy-Gill| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

Planning to watch the Academy Awards this weekend? We've got movie reviews for some of the best picture nominees, as well as plenty of other films that weren't nominated, but were considered top films for 2011 by our regular culture columnist, Pat McCormick. 

Did you see a film that recieved a nomination but isn't reviewed here? Let us know what you thought of it in the comments. You can also send film reviews to onlineeditor@uscatholic.org at any time.


Read: Between Heaven and Mirth

By Heidi Schlumpf| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
Between Heaven and Mirth
By James Martin, SJ (HarperOne, 2011)

Perhaps I am not the best person to review this book. Although not completely humorless, I have been told that I am not particularly funny. And I do have a disposition that has earned me the occasional nickname “Negative Norma.”


Read: Learning to Die in Miami

By Carol DeChant| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
Learning to Die in Miami
By Carlos Eire (Free Press, 2011)

In 1962 Carlos Eire was one of 14,000 children evacuated from Cuba by Catholic parents who believed Fidel Castro would be ousted within months. Those evacuees still living are now grey-haired Cuban-Americans. Eire has written a compelling memoir of that era’s repeated losses (the “dying” of his title), and of what he ultimately gained.


Listen: The Harrow & The Harvest

By Danny Duncan Collum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
The Harrow & The Harvest
Gillian Welch (Acony Records, 2011)

Gillian Welch has described the 10 songs on The Harrow & The Harvest as “10 kinds of miserable.” And that’s pretty accurate. The characters here find themselves mortified, exiled, overdosed, and finally laid to rest “with a pistol in my vest.” These are 21st-century original songs planted firmly in the American old-time folk tradition, the kind that Bob Dylan once described as brimming with “despair . . . sadness . . . triumph, [and] faith in the supernatural.”


USC Book Club: A Dangerous Dozen

Liz Lefebvre| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article

February 2012:

A Dangerous Dozen: 12 Christians who Threatened the Status Quo But Taught Us to Live Like Jesus

By the Rev. Canon C.K. Robertson, PhD
Foreward by Archbishop Desmond Tutu

Review:


Watch: The Artist

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
The Artist
Directed by Michel Hazanavicius (Weinstein, 2011)

Those not captivated by Michel Hazanavicius’s silent movie must have a tin ear where their heart should be. In this dazzling black and white romance about the fall of a silent matinee idol, Hazanavicius has mixed Top Hat, A Star Is Born, Singing in the Rain, and Citizen Kane, fashioning a Hollywood epic as American and universal as any modern film in a heartwarming cocktail shot through with grace, wit, and charm.


Read: Journey to the Common Good

By A. Regina Schulte| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
Journey to the Common Good
By Walter Brueggemann (Westminster John Knox, 2010)

In this compact study, biblical theologian Walter Brueggemann traces a remarkably similar pattern of cause and effect between the crises in today’s world—chronic war-making, ecological destruction, economic injustices—and the defining events in Jewish tradition.


Read: Party of One

By Alice Camille| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
Party of One
By Beth M. Knobbe (St. Anthony Messenger, 2011)

If you are single, this book needs no justification. Though the majority of us inhabit that category innocently for the first two decades of life, if a third decade waxes and wanes, you find you have some explaining to do. And if you manage to close a fourth decade without a partner, the range of responses often moves from pity to suspicion. What’s wrong with you that no one’s popped the question?


Watch: The Ides of March

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
The Ides of March
Directed by George Clooney (Columbia Pictures, 2011)

As the title suggests, George Clooney’s cynical drama about a presidential campaign is a tale of loyalties and betrayals, both personal and political, and of the hollow victories achieved through these various treasons.


Pages