Who Would Jesus Kill? War, Peace, and the Christian Tradition

By James Halstead, O.S.A.| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

By Mark J. Allman (St. Mary’s Press, 2008)

“Who would Jesus kill?” asks author Mark Allman in this introduction to Christian thought on the ideal of peace and the morality of warfare. The answer is easy: No one! The unmarried, childless, propertyless, non-political Jesus of the canonical gospels kills no one.


Moral Kombat

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Marriage and Family Reviews
How much should we worry about the daily dose of interactive, virtual murder and mayhem in our kids’ lives?

Video games first came to an arcade or home near yours in 1972 with the likes of Pong and Odyssey. By the early 1990s these tiddlywinks games had been replaced by richly interactive and violent games like Mortal Kombat and Wolfenstein.


The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

Directed by David Fincher (Paramount Pictures, 2008)

David Fincher’s movie version of a farcical short story by F. Scott Fitzgerald tells the backwards tale of a man born old who spends his life growing young, ultimately dying as an infant.


Whatever happened I apologize

By Danny Duncan Collum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

Jay Bennett (rockproper.com, 2008)

Back in the late 1990s, Wilco was the great American rock band, and Jay Bennett was one of its key members. Today Wilco is mostly a rotating cast of sidemen for Jeff Tweedy, and Bennett is a producer, session player, and indie solo artist.


All Rebel Rockers

By Danny Duncan Collum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

Michael Franti and Spearhead (ANTI, 2008)

Michael Franti has been knocking around the fringes of the rock and rap scene for almost 20 years. Franti first surfaced as a member of a punk band called The Beatnigs, then fused punk and rap with the Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprisy. Last year he nibbled at the edges of mainstream popularity with a righteously angry and delightfully funky anti-war album, Yell Fire.


Slumdog Millionaire

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

Directed by Danny Boyle (Fox Searchlight, 2008)

Just in time for our now officially recognized global recession, British film maker Danny Boyle has created a rollicking, riotous, and not infrequently gut-wrenching Dickensian fantasy in which a poor orphan from the slums of Mumbai skyrockets to fame and fortune as a contestant on India's version of Who Wants to be a Millionaire?


Reel politics

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Politics Reviews
Hollywood tells us that cleaning up Washington depends on the integrity of those we send there. But that’s only part of the story.

Soon the 2008 presidential campaign will be over, and the airways will be free of electoral promises and polls, for a few months at least. During this brief hiatus political junkies who can’t get their daily dose of campaign stories and scandals from the “real TV” we call network and cable news will have to rent movies about the drama and comedy of electoral politics.


Rachel Getting Married

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Article Reviews

Rachel Getting Married
Sony Pictures Classics, 2008

Director Jonathan Demme and writer Jenny Lumet’s ensemble film about a big sprawling suburban wedding reminds us that marriage is a mix of chosen and un-chosen unions. The coupling of husband and wife also joins together a menagerie of pleasant and decidedly unpleasant relatives who become, for better or worse, our in-laws and lifelong companions.


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