The Reader

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
Directed by Stephen Daldry (The Weinstein Co., 2008)

In traditional coming-of-age tales, sexuality opens up new worlds for a young man, and the first affair helps transform him from a child to a man. But in Bernhard Schlink's best-selling story about paralyzing guilt and secrets, young Michael Berg (David Kross) is permanently derailed by a seduction that will forever exile him from the world of adult relations and the true pleasures of emotional and sexual intimacy.


In Due Season: A Catholic Life

By Becky Garrison| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
By Paul Wilkes (Jossey Bass, 2009)

In In Due Season, Paul Wilkes unpacks his story with a searing honesty that reveals a life filled with the cycles of finding and then losing God. Here the reader gets a personalized story of one man's faith played against the backdrop of changes transpiring in 20th-century American Catholicism.


Playing for change

By Danny Duncan Collum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
Various Artists (Hear Music, 2009)

And they do mean various! This CD/DVD release includes artists from India to Ireland, South Africa to Russia, Israel to California, and practically all points in between. There is even a posthumous appearance from reggae prophet Bob Marley. Some of the Playing for Change musicians are famous (Bono of U2) or semi-famous (American bluesman Keb Mo). Others are barely known outside their hometowns. They are all united by producer Mark Johnson's vision of music as a unifying force for peace and progress.


Sunshine Cleaning

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Article Reviews
Directed by Christine Jeffs and Megan Holley (Overture Films, 2009)

Christine Jeffs and Megan Holley's touching film about a spunky but dysfunctional family on economic and emotional skids is something of a misfit-part fairy tale about two lovely but cursed sisters and part dark comedy about the underside of the American Dream. But maybe a film about misfits should have some of the same unpolished and uneven feel of its characters, inviting exasperation and compassion in response to folks more like us than we would like to think.


Duplicity

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Article Reviews

 

DuplicityDirected by Tony Gilroy (Universal, 2009)

 

They don’t make them like this anymore. They try often enough, but only once in a blue moon do they get the magic right. Tony Gilroy’s Duplicity is two parts screwball comedy, one part caper film, and a dash of light espionage shaken together in a cinematic cocktail that would please Cole Porter and James Bond.

Imagine Julia Roberts and Clive Owen filling in (very nicely indeed) for Katherine Hepburn and Cary Grant in a fast-talking, role-reversing comedy about the war between the sexes.


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