Popular Songs

By Danny Duncan Collum| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

Yo La Tengo (Matador Records, 2009)

First off, Yo La Tengo is not a salsa band. They're not even Hispanic. They are white, artsy-bohemian types in their mid-to-late 40s. The band name, which means "I have it," was what guitarist Ira Kaplan heard a Spanish-speaking New York Mets outfielder using to call a teammate off a fly ball.

Yo La Tengo is heavily identified with New York's lower Manhattan underground culture, so much so that they were chosen to portray The Velvet Undergound in an Andy Warhol bio-pic.


10 Things I Hate About Christianity

By Sarah Sharp| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

By Jason Berggren (X Media, 2009)

So much for Paul's assertion to the Corinthians that "the greatest of these is love." Jason Berggren openly admits in his debut book, subtitled "Working Through the Frustrations of Faith," that hate isn't what you're supposed to feel, but he's an angry young man and he does anyway. He hates that parts of his faith don't make sense, he hates that faith takes so much work, and he hates that he wouldn't have it any other way.


A Pilgrim in a Pilgrim Church: Memoirs of a Catholic Archbishop

By J. Peter Nixon| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

by Rembert Weakland (Eerdmans, 2009)

When Milwaukee Archbishop Rembert Weakland resigned in May 2002, he did so in the midst of a media firestorm. Earlier that month, ABC News had broadcast an interview with Paul Marcoux, who claimed that Weakland had sexually assaulted him two decades earlier. In the days that followed, the public learned that the Archdiocese of Milwaukee had paid $450,000 to Marcoux in a confidential settlement. Subsequent revelations suggesting that the relationship had been consensual did little to salvage Weakland's reputation.


Outliers: The Story of Success

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews

by Malcolm Gladwell (Little, Brown, and Company, 2008)


What happens at the end of the book?

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Spirituality
E-books will change the way we read, but the digital future of fiction remains unclear.

The Reader

By Patrick McCormick| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
Directed by Stephen Daldry (The Weinstein Co., 2008)

In traditional coming-of-age tales, sexuality opens up new worlds for a young man, and the first affair helps transform him from a child to a man. But in Bernhard Schlink's best-selling story about paralyzing guilt and secrets, young Michael Berg (David Kross) is permanently derailed by a seduction that will forever exile him from the world of adult relations and the true pleasures of emotional and sexual intimacy.


In Due Season: A Catholic Life

By Becky Garrison| Print this pagePrint | Email this pageShare
Article Reviews
By Paul Wilkes (Jossey Bass, 2009)

In In Due Season, Paul Wilkes unpacks his story with a searing honesty that reveals a life filled with the cycles of finding and then losing God. Here the reader gets a personalized story of one man's faith played against the backdrop of changes transpiring in 20th-century American Catholicism.


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